OpenAI expands lobbying efforts, hiring former US senator

Artificial technology company OpenAI has expanded its stable of federal lobbyists, retaining former Republican U.S. Sen. Norm Coleman to advocate on research and development issues for the Microsoft-backed startup.

Published - March 13, 2024 01:05 pm IST

OpenAI expands lobbying efforts, hiring former US senator.

OpenAI expands lobbying efforts, hiring former US senator. | Photo Credit: AP

Artificial technology company OpenAI has expanded its stable of federal lobbyists, retaining former Republican U.S. Sen. Norm Coleman to advocate on research and development issues for the Microsoft-backed startup.

Coleman's law firm Hogan Lovells disclosed the hire in a U.S. lobbying registration filing last week, showing San Francisco-based OpenAI retained the former Minnesota lawmaker in January.

OpenAI, which owns the chatbot ChatGPT and has become the face of generative AI, is embroiled in myriad legal fights, including copyright infringement claims from authors and others. It has denied any intellectual property violations.

Billionaire entrepreneur and OpenAI co-founder Elon Musk is also suing the company in San Francisco court, accusing it of straying from its nonprofit mission to develop AI that helps humanity.

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OpenAI and its two other co-founders, including Sam Altman, have called the lawsuit “convoluted” and “incoherent.”

OpenAI and Coleman, a senior counsel at 2,600-lawyer Hogan Lovells, on Tuesday did not immediately respond to requests for comment.

Other prominent law firms, including Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld and DLA Piper, have registered lobbyists for OpenAI.

OpenAI in November first registered an in-house lobbyist, Chan Park, head of the company’s U.S. and Canada policy and partnerships team.

Park was formerly senior director of congressional affairs at Microsoft before joining OpenAI last year. He did not immediately respond to a request for comment on Tuesday about the company's lobbying.

The company disclosed spending $260,000 on U.S. lobbying in the fourth quarter on matters, including copyright and journalism. OpenAI has projected a revenue surge in 2024.

Coleman served in the U.S. Senate from 2003 to 2009 and joined Hogan Lovells in Washington, D.C., in 2011.

The ex-senator’s other lobbying clients at the firm include T-Mobile USA, United States Steel and Xcel Energy.

Read more:

OpenAI hires Musk foe Wachtell to fight lawsuit over company's mission

Law firm Hogan Lovells reports revenue, profit highs in 2023

Authors suing OpenAI lose bid to halt rival N.Y. copyright lawsuits

Humans vs. machines: the fight to copyright AI art

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