India leads in adoption of Multi-Factor Authentication: Report

With the past two years of pandemic resulting in an altered working environment of hybrid and remote work, changes in security were both necessary and notable.

October 07, 2022 01:46 pm | Updated October 10, 2022 08:45 pm IST

Firms are concerned about the security risks of remote work

Firms are concerned about the security risks of remote work | Photo Credit: Reuters

India has the highest overall percentage of MFA usage this year at 66% among all countries surveyed compared to the global adoption level of 56%, according to a research release by Thales, a global tech firm.

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“New threats, risks, and vulnerabilities as well as evolving business requirements underscore the need for robust Access Management, Multi Factor Authentication,” said Ashish Saraf, Vice President and Country Director, India at Thales.

“The strong growth in adoption of Multi-Factor Authentication in India points towards rising awareness and a commitment towards ensuring high levels of security in enterprise environments,” he added.

With the past two years of the pandemic resulting in an altered working environment of hybrid and remote work, changes in security were both necessary and notable. Firms remain concerned about the security risks of remote work but are also growing more confident in the ability of authentication to manage those risks. 

India also has the highest percentage increase of MFA adoption up 19 percentage points followed by Singapore with a 17-percentage-point increase in adoption to 64%, and UAE with a 10-percentage-point increase, to 65%, according to estimates by Thales.

The findings are from the 2022 Thales Access Management Study from a survey of more than 2,800 security professionals and executive leaders in more than 15 countries across the globe.

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