Letters

On alcoholism

Alcoholism cannot be eliminated by merely creating awareness (“Dealing with a spirit that can kill,” July 2). Policy interventions like restricting supply worked in the case of tobacco. Unfortunately, State governments, as in Kerala and Tamil Nadu, are monopoly vendors of Indian Made Foreign Liquor. The liquor business brings in huge revenues. Therefore, they do not see any urgency in weaning people away from the bottle. The constitutional validity of governments selling liquor, a harmful substance when taken in excess, needs to be examined.

V.N. Mukundarajan,

Thiruvananthapuram

Despite being aware of the dangerous effects of alcohol, people consume it for the pleasure it gives for a short time. In most cases, victims of alcoholism are from the economically backward families. Though there are many organisations that help alcoholics, the poor and illiterate do not have access to them. The government should be sensitive to their suffering and consider a ban on alcohol. The liquor industry may generate huge revenues but they come from the blood and sweat of the poor.

S.A. Thameemul Ansari,

Kayalpatnam

The greatest irony of our times is that governments, on the one hand, sell alcohol for revenue generation and treat alcohol related diseases through their hospitals, on the other!

Francis Scott Key Fitzgerald said on alcohol: “First you take a drink, then the drink takes a drink, then the drink takes you.” We need more non-addiction promoting centres, rather than de-addiction centres.

Araveeti Rama Yogaiah,

Hyderabad

Aamir Khan has done a commendable job by taking up the issue of alcoholism, particularly among the youth. While touching on the repercussions of alcoholism and hazardous drinking, he has made no mention of one of the main reasons of teenage alcoholism. Most children from the upper middle class take to drinking because of the glamour and “cool” factor it creates in the peer group. This glamour is derived from movies. Earlier, the qualities through which villains were identified have become symbols for heroes in Indian cinema today. On the one hand, Mr. Khan preaches us not to drink and, on the other, in Rang de Basanti he is shown drinking.

Arpan Maheshwari,

New Delhi

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Printable version | Mar 5, 2021 2:08:55 PM | https://www.thehindu.com/opinion/letters/on-alcoholism/article3595529.ece

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