Watch: Explained: What are the three new criminal laws?

Watch: Explained: What are the three new criminal laws?

A look into the key provisions of the three new laws and the concerns surrounding them

Updated - July 02, 2024 12:36 pm IST

Published - July 01, 2024 08:08 pm IST

From July 1, India will replace its colonial-era criminal laws with a set of three new penal laws. The Indian Penal Code of 1860 will be substituted by the Bharatiya Nyaya Sanhita or the BNS, the Code of Criminal Procedure of 1973 will give way to the Bharatiya Nagarik Suraksha Sanhita or the BNSS, and the Indian Evidence Act, 1872 will be replaced by the Bharatiya Sakshya Adhiniyam or the BSB.

These laws were first introduced by the Centre on August 11 last year following which they were referred to a 31-member Parliamentary Standing Committee headed by BJP MP Brij Lal for review. The revised Bills were later introduced in the Lok Sabha by Union Home Minister Amit Shah on December 12th and received Presidential assent on December 25th.

However, the laws have stirred controversy with legal experts and jurists questioning the lack of transparency in the functioning of the 5-member expert committee chaired by Prof. (Dr.) Ranbir Singh, former Vice Chancellor of National Law University, Delhi, tasked with the responsibility of drafting these laws. Many have also flagged how the new laws expand police powers at the expense of civil liberties.

In this video, we will delve into the key provisions of the three new laws and the concerns surrounding them.

Read more:  Revised criminal law bills: Key changes explained 

0 / 0
Sign in to unlock member-only benefits!
  • Access 10 free stories every month
  • Save stories to read later
  • Access to comment on every story
  • Sign-up/manage your newsletter subscriptions with a single click
  • Get notified by email for early access to discounts & offers on our products
Sign in

Comments

Comments have to be in English, and in full sentences. They cannot be abusive or personal. Please abide by our community guidelines for posting your comments.

We have migrated to a new commenting platform. If you are already a registered user of The Hindu and logged in, you may continue to engage with our articles. If you do not have an account please register and login to post comments. Users can access their older comments by logging into their accounts on Vuukle.