State-sponsored litigation clogging judicial system, says N V Ramana

September 24, 2022 08:54 pm | Updated 08:55 pm IST - HYDERABAD

Former Chief Justice of India N.V. Ramana along with Dean of The Indian School of Business (ISB) Professor Madan Pillutla and others during the  ISB Leadership Summit- 2022 on theme `Prism of Possibilities’ at ISB campus in Hyderabad on Saturday.

Former Chief Justice of India N.V. Ramana along with Dean of The Indian School of Business (ISB) Professor Madan Pillutla and others during the ISB Leadership Summit- 2022 on theme `Prism of Possibilities’ at ISB campus in Hyderabad on Saturday. | Photo Credit: NAGARA GOPAL

Former Chief Justice of India N V Ramana on Saturday expressed concerns over the government being the biggest litigator and pointed out that that a halt in “State-sponsored” litigation would reduce the judiciary’s problems by half.

Justice Ramana was speaking at the Indian School of Business Leadership Summit 2022 - Prism of Possibilities.

“As I told in the presence of the Honourable Prime Minister, one of the major concerns is that the government is the biggest litigator. The number of inter-departmental disputes, service matters, and those relating to the inaction of authorities clogging the system is appalling. Half of the judiciary’s problems would be solved the moment the government decides to put a halt to State sponsored litigation,” Justice Ramana said.

Justice Ramana opined that the independence of the judiciary is limited to only adjudication and that it does not have the power of “the purse or the sword”. “When it comes to financial support and appointments, coordinating with the government is always like walking a tightrope,” Justice Ramana said, even as he underscored that the role of the CJI extends to the entire judicial system, and must entail paying attention to standards of legal education and to build a “constitutional culture among the people”.

Touching upon the pressures the CJI faces, Justice Ramana added, “And the Chief Justice of India must do it in the face of various pressures from different quarters- the Government, the opposition, lawyers, judges, NGOs, civil society, social media, etc.”

Addressing the students, the former CJI underscored the essentiality of having a basic understanding of the constitution. “The world of business is no exception to this. Business is not only a means of generating wealth. It is a means of economic liberation. While trying to maximize profits, we must draw a line and stay away from exploitation of all forms. This is the reason that I think a basic understanding of the Indian Constitution is essential for all, including business students,” he said.

He advised business students to adopt models that ensure the distribution of wealth and bring about poverty alleviation. “Accumulation of wealth, disproportionately, in a select few hands is a sure shot formula for friction in the society. Poverty alleviation and equitable income distribution are the need of the hour,” he said.

Rajiv Kumar, Manaing Director, Microsoft India, touched upon the importance of decision making. Drawing from his personal experiences, Mr Kumar said that clarity of goals, adequate data and avoiding analysis paralysis are important facets. He also underscored the importance of having a “presence” and the importance of communication and “generous listening”.

Kedar Lele, Executive Director, Hindustan Unilever, used the case of Olympian Karoly Takacs as an example of years of perseverance, facing adversities, and emerging victorious. He also spoke about how HUL, which wants to reach every household, found rural India a great opportunity. He said that the company does not muscle out the local kirana store, but works with them.

Smita Sabharwal, Secretary to the Chief Minister of Telangana, spoke about the Kaleswaram project and Telangana’s journey to become a “water sufficient state”.

ISB Dean Prof Madan Pillutla and Saraswati veena player Jayanthi Kumaresh also spoke.

Top News Today

Comments

Comments have to be in English, and in full sentences. They cannot be abusive or personal. Please abide by our community guidelines for posting your comments.

We have migrated to a new commenting platform. If you are already a registered user of The Hindu and logged in, you may continue to engage with our articles. If you do not have an account please register and login to post comments. Users can access their older comments by logging into their accounts on Vuukle.