International

Pope beseeches world leaders to protect the environment

Pope Francis addresses a plenary meeting of the United Nations Sustainable Development Summit 2015 at United Nations headquarters in Manhattan, New York, September 25, 2015.

Pope Francis addresses a plenary meeting of the United Nations Sustainable Development Summit 2015 at United Nations headquarters in Manhattan, New York, September 25, 2015.  

Pope Francis declared that there is a “ >right of the environment” and that mankind has no authority to abuse it, urging more than 100 world leaders and diplomats at the United Nations to halt the destruction of God’s creation.



The Pope’s speech, the fifth by a pope to the U.N., was a distillation of his recent teaching document on the environment, “Praise Be,” which has delighted liberals and environmentalists and drawn scorn from big business interests.



By bringing the document to life before the U.N., Pope Francis made clear his priorities.



“Any harm done to the environment, therefore, is harm done to humanity,” he said.



Francis’ speech kicked off what was expected to be a whirlwind day in New York that blended the powerful and the poor, from the solemnity of ground zero and to the struggles of East Harlem.



He was greeted >on his arrival at the U.N. by Secretary General Ban Ki-moon, a key supporter of Francis’ agenda.



In his opening remarks, Mr. Ban praised Francis for his priorities.



“You are at home not in palaces, but among the poor; not with the famous, but with the forgotten; not in official portraits, but in ‘selfies’ with young people,” he said.



Among those in the audience for Francis’ speech was Nobel peace laureate Malala Yousefzai, the young Pakistani education campaigner who was shot and gravely wounded by the Taliban. She will be addressing the U.N. summit later.



While his visit marks the fifth time a >pope has been to the United Nations, the Vatican flag was raised for the first time just before his arrival. The General Assembly recently agreed to allow the U.N.’s two observer states, the Holy See and Palestine, to fly their flags alongside those of the 193 member states.



Speaking in the packed General Assembly hall, Francis stated that “a right of the environment” exists.



Echoing his encyclical’s key message, he said a “selfish and boundless thirst for power and material prosperity leads both to the misuse of available natural resources and to the exclusion of the weak and disadvantaged.”



After the U.N., the pope was scheduled to visit the 9/11 memorial, where two waterfall pools mark the outlines of the World Trade Center’s twin towers before they were toppled by the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001.



Francis’ plans for Friday afternoon reflected the penchant of the “people’s pope” for engaging with the public.



First on the agenda was a visit to Our Lady Queen of Angels School, set amid public housing in the heavily Hispanic neighborhood of East Harlem.



Known for ministering to the downtrodden in his native Buenos Aires, Francis was set to meet schoolchildren and offer a special blessing to refugees and immigrants, including people living in the country illegally.



Then he is to greet as many as 80,000 onlookers during a drive through Central Park, en route to Mass for 18,000 at Madison Square Garden.



On Thursday, in Washington, the pope waded into bitter disputes while speaking to Congress, entreating the nation to share its immense wealth with those less fortunate. He also urged the nation to abolish the death penalty, fight global warming and embrace immigrants.



Francis wraps up his U.S. visit this weekend in Philadelphia, where he speaks in front of Independence Hall and celebrates Mass on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway to close out a big rally on Catholic families.

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Printable version | May 25, 2020 6:37:38 PM | https://www.thehindu.com/news/international/pope-beseeches-world-leaders-to-protect-the-environment/article7689651.ece

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