EU to limit visas if countries refuse to take back migrants

Readmission of own nationals is an obligation under international law: Migration Commissioner Dimitris Avramopoulos

Updated - December 01, 2021 12:34 pm IST

Published - March 14, 2018 05:57 pm IST - BRUSSELS:

European Commissioner for Migration Dimitris Avramopoulos addressing a press conference at the European Commission in Brussels on March 14, 2018.

European Commissioner for Migration Dimitris Avramopoulos addressing a press conference at the European Commission in Brussels on March 14, 2018.

The European Union (EU) moved on Wednesday to speed up the return of unauthorized migrants, announcing plans to punish countries that refuse to take back their nationals by restricting visas for their diplomats.

While the number of people entering Europe in search of better lives has dropped dramatically over the past year, EU countries only send back around half of migrants denied visas, often because the migrants have lost or destroyed their ID documents and it’s difficult to establish their nationality. Fake ID is also often used.

France irate with Mali

France, for example, is angered that Mali routinely refuses to take back people that Paris insists are from there.

Formalizing a threat already made to some African countries by EU member-states, the EU’s executive Commission announced that it has “a new mechanism to trigger stricter conditions for processing visas when a partner country does not cooperate sufficiently.”

The aim is to target decision-makers by dragging out the application time for diplomatic visas, hiking costs or cutting short their stays.

At the same time, the Commission has said it plans to make tourism visas more attractive. It would allow for earlier applications, electronic visas, and strictly limited stays of one week in one EU country.

Visa, dear visa

But the price of visas already beyond the means of most Africans — would rise from 60 to 80 euros ($74 to $99), leaving many heading to Europe in search of better lives with little incentive to apply.

“With these changes, we will keep Europe’s door open for bone fide travelers but closed for those who pose security risks,” said EU Migration Commissioner Dimitris Avramopoulos.

Mr. Avramopoulos said he would shortly travel to Niger, a transit hub for many migrants bound for Europe via Libya, for talks with regional leaders, and that he would try to “convince these countries to take back their nationals.”

“Readmission of own nationals is an obligation under international law,” he said.

Also Wednesday, the Commission said it was mobilizing the second 3-billion-euro ($3.7 billion) tranche of refugee money for Turkey, even though the move was endorsed several weeks ago.

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