Focus on the global espionage network

Updated - November 28, 2021 09:33 pm IST

Published - November 29, 2010 03:33 am IST - LONDON

The cables published on Sunday reveal how the U.S. uses its embassies as part of a global espionage network, with diplomats tasked to obtain not just information from the people they meet, but personal details, such as frequent flyer numbers, credit card details and even DNA material.

Classified “human intelligence directives” issued in the name of Hillary Clinton or her predecessor, Condoleeza Rice, instruct officials to gather information on military installations, weapons markings, vehicle details of political leaders as well as iris scans, fingerprints and DNA.

The most controversial target was the leadership of the United Nations. That directive requested the specification of telecoms and IT systems used by top U.N. officials and their staff and details of “private VIP networks used for official communication, to include upgrades, security measures, passwords, personal encryption keys.”

When the Guardian put this allegation to Crowley, the state department spokesman said: “Let me assure you: our diplomats are just that, diplomats. They do not engage in intelligence activities. They represent our country around the world, maintain open and transparent contact with other governments as well as public and private figures, and report home. That's what diplomats have done for hundreds of years.”

© Guardian Newspapers Limited, 2010

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