42.7% of T.N.’s long coastline is eroding, reveals study

As per data provided in the National Assessment of Shoreline changes along Indian Coast report, around 332.69 km is stable and 235.85 km is accreting. Long-term shoreline analysis indicated that the coast is dominated by erosion

Updated - January 11, 2023 05:59 pm IST

Published - January 11, 2023 12:24 am IST - CHENNAI

Long-term shoreline analysis indicated that the coast is affected by erosion. File photo used for representation.

Long-term shoreline analysis indicated that the coast is affected by erosion. File photo used for representation. | Photo Credit: S.S. KUMAR

  

A total of 422.94 km, constituting 42.7% of the State’s long coastline is eroding; 332.69 km is stable and 235.85 km is accreting, according to data provided in the National Assessment of Shoreline Changes along Indian Coast report.

The report, brought out after studies on the State’s coast between 1990 to 2018, said 16.16 km of the length of coast had high levels of erosion (less than 5m/year), 37.15 had moderate (between 5m and 3m/year) and 369.63 km had low erosion (3m to 0.5 m/year). Long-term shoreline analysis indicated that the coast is dominated by erosion. A total of 80 maps on the shoreline of Tamil Nadu have been prepared by the National Centre for Coastal Research (NCCR), as part of the study.

Minister for Highways and Minor Ports E.V. Velu, who released the report at a workshop on Marine Spatial Planning for Tamil Nadu organised at the NCCR here on Tuesday, said safeguarding of the State’s coast was an important duty of the government since various sectors including fishing, shipping, tourism and environment depended on it. 

NCCR Director M.V. Ramana Murthy said a thorough understanding of long-time shoreline changes, its behaviour and extent, among others, are required before implementing any coastal protection scheme. A timely or advanced information on the coastal condition can effectively help to plan and prepare better for mitigating coastal changes. The N-SAS was prepared by the NCCR to identify the erosion and accretion hotspots for coastal monitoring and management, he added.

Scientist G of NCCR Tune Usha said about 991.47 km of coastal length was mapped on a 1:25000 scale to analyse the temporal shoreline changes from 1990 to 2018, using 11 data sets.

The results were classified into seven categories — low erosion, moderate erosion, high erosion, stable accretion, low accretion, moderate accretion and high accretion.

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