Bengaluru

Total lunar eclipse 2018 or blood moon: See the dark side of the moon

The partial eclipse of the Moon will begin at 11.54 p.m. IST on July 27. The Moon will be gradually covered by Earth’s shadow and the totality phase will begin at 1 a.m. IST on July 28 and the total eclipse will last up to 2.43 a.m. File

The partial eclipse of the Moon will begin at 11.54 p.m. IST on July 27. The Moon will be gradually covered by Earth’s shadow and the totality phase will begin at 1 a.m. IST on July 28 and the total eclipse will last up to 2.43 a.m. File  

Look up to the skies late on July 27 for a total lunar eclipse.

The term ‘blood moon’ may be a rather sinister description for a total eclipse of the moon, but that doesn’t take away from the special event which will unfold in the skies on July 27. Around the world, people will be able to view the longest lunar experience of the 21st century, lasting one hour and 43 minutes. And in Bengaluru, events are being organised by various institutions to help people understand the phenomenon.

Breakthrough Science Society is organising a public seminar at SJR Women's college at Rajajinagar on Friday from 2 p.m. to 3 p.m. The lecture will be delivered by Professor Jayant Murthy, senior astrophysicist in the Indian Institute of Astrophysics, on 'walking through the ages of the moon’. He will be speaking about the relevance of a lunar eclipse. Arrangement have been made to view the astronomical event.

The Jawaharlal Nehru Planetarium is setting up several telescopes on its premises. People can view the moon between 11.30 p.m. and 3 a.m. depending on conditions in the sky.

The Jawaharlal Nehru Planetarium in Bengaluru is setting up several telescopes on its premises. People can view the moon between 11.30 p.m. and 3 a.m. depending on conditions in the sky.

The Jawaharlal Nehru Planetarium in Bengaluru is setting up several telescopes on its premises. People can view the moon between 11.30 p.m. and 3 a.m. depending on conditions in the sky.   | Photo Credit: K_MURALI_KUMAR

 

So far, 2018 has been a year filled with several rare celestial experiences: we got to witness rare lunar events in the form of super moon, blue moon and a total lunar eclipse in January.

Pramod G. Galgali, Director, Jawaharlal Nehru Planetarium, said, "Unlike solar eclipses, lunar eclipses can be witnessed without any special equipment. These lunar events, which occur when the moon passes into Earth's shadow, are safe to view directly with the naked eye, telescopes or binoculars."

Some schools are planning to arrange special viewings for its students. The Mahila Seva Samaj School, in association with Aryabhata Planetarium, will be setting up a high-end telescope in the playground to view the spectacular blood moon. “Parents can accompany children to view the eclipse. We had sent a circular regarding this a while ago, and there has been a good response,” said Shree S. Iyengar, Head Mistress of the school.

FAQs

What is special about the blood moon?

This will be the longest lunar eclipse of the century. The total lunar eclipse would last for one hour and 43 minutes while partial eclipses, which would precede and follow the total eclipse, would last more than an hour. The partial eclipse of the moon will start at 11.54 p.m. on July 27. The total eclipse would begin at 1 a.m. on July 28. The moon will be the darkest at 1.52 a.m. on July 28 and would continue till 2.43 a.m. It will remain partially eclipsed till 3.49 a.m. of July 28. The moon will have a reddish hue, a phenomenon popularly referred to as a blood moon.

How can one watch the lunar eclipse?

Locate a high-rise building or any open space from where the moon rise will be clearly visible.

Can anybody watch the phenomenon?

Yes. There is no scientific evidence of any harmful rays or increase in microbial activity during eclipses. It is absolutely safe to eat, drink water and continue doing our normal activities during eclipses.

Source: Jawaharlal Nehru Planetarium, Bengaluru

A letter from the Editor


Dear reader,

We have been keeping you up-to-date with information on the developments in India and the world that have a bearing on our health and wellbeing, our lives and livelihoods, during these difficult times. To enable wide dissemination of news that is in public interest, we have increased the number of articles that can be read free, and extended free trial periods. However, we have a request for those who can afford to subscribe: please do. As we fight disinformation and misinformation, and keep apace with the happenings, we need to commit greater resources to news gathering operations. We promise to deliver quality journalism that stays away from vested interest and political propaganda.

Support Quality Journalism
Recommended for you
This article is closed for comments.
Please Email the Editor

Printable version | May 25, 2020 5:20:50 PM | https://www.thehindu.com/news/cities/bangalore/see-dark-side-of-the-moon/article24522172.ece

Next Story