Bengaluru

Finally, Bengaluru may get recycling plants for construction debris

Karnataka, Bengaluru: 11/12/2015: Buildings being demolished as the work on Phase 2 of Bangalore’s Metro project officially begun by Bangalore Metro Rail Corporation Limited (BMRCL), at Nayandahalli towards Kengeri (6.46 km), on Western Line, in Bengaluru on December 11, 2015. As per the second phase plan, BMRCL has proposed to extend the existing east-west line from Nayandahalli to Kengeri. The line continues to be on the median of Mysore Road till it reaches Kengeri station. The five stations which will come up are Nayandahalli, Rajarajeshwari Nagar, Bangalore University Cross, RV College of Engineering and Kengeri. It is expected take two years and three months for completion of the project. As per  the tender, construction of the elevated structure would start from Nayandahalli to Kengeri station. The BMRCL will spend an estimated Rs.300 crore for building the first-ever stretch under Phase II. The extension corridor has five stations — Nayandahalli, Rajarajeshwarinagar, Bangalore University Cross, RV College of Engineering and Kengeri. The BMRCL will also build a huge depot on 35 acres of land after Kengeri Station.     Photo K Murali Kumar.

Karnataka, Bengaluru: 11/12/2015: Buildings being demolished as the work on Phase 2 of Bangalore’s Metro project officially begun by Bangalore Metro Rail Corporation Limited (BMRCL), at Nayandahalli towards Kengeri (6.46 km), on Western Line, in Bengaluru on December 11, 2015. As per the second phase plan, BMRCL has proposed to extend the existing east-west line from Nayandahalli to Kengeri. The line continues to be on the median of Mysore Road till it reaches Kengeri station. The five stations which will come up are Nayandahalli, Rajarajeshwari Nagar, Bangalore University Cross, RV College of Engineering and Kengeri. It is expected take two years and three months for completion of the project. As per the tender, construction of the elevated structure would start from Nayandahalli to Kengeri station. The BMRCL will spend an estimated Rs.300 crore for building the first-ever stretch under Phase II. The extension corridor has five stations — Nayandahalli, Rajarajeshwarinagar, Bangalore University Cross, RV College of Engineering and Kengeri. The BMRCL will also build a huge depot on 35 acres of land after Kengeri Station. Photo K Murali Kumar.

Open sites and grounds that often became targets of people dumping debris from the construction and demolition (C&D) of structures in the city can be spared of such littering in future, with the Bruhat Bengaluru Mahanagara Palike (BBMP) making efforts to set up plants to process and recycle the same.

At present, with no other option, people often dump debris in open spaces on the city’s outskirts or in abandoned quarries. Though it can be recycled, the debris is left to waste.

BBMP now wants to set up three construction waste and debris recycling plants on the outskirts of the city. These will be able to handle a capacity of 750 tonnes each per day, totalling to a total capacity of 2250 tonnes per day. If the BBMP has its way, once these plants are functional, you will not need to worry about disposing off the construction waste or debris anymore.

A recent study estimated that the city produces around 2500 tonnes of C&D waste each day.

The project comes in the backdrop of June 2012 guidelines from the Urban Development Department (UDD), Union of India, for all cities above the population of 10 lakh, to set up C&D waste processing plants. Presently, only New Delhi has a functional network of such plants handling the city’s generation of C&D waste. Pune is also in the process of setting up such a plant.

BBMP is proposing the setting up of three plants at Kannur, Mallasandra and Anjanapura on the outskirts of the city. BBMP, which will provide land for the plants, has now called for tenders seeking interest from private players to set up these plants. While the investment on machinery is expected to cost around Rs. 22 crore, the private firm will be given a twenty-year lease of the land, with a profit-sharing agreement with the civic agency. Sources said that a few firms had shown interest. It will take six months before the plants are fully functional, BBMP officials said.

As per the tender notification, those who run the plants should also run transport services to collect construction waste from your doorstep, within 48 hours of you booking a slot, either online or over the phone. However, the waste generators need to bear the cost of transportation.

Big builders should submit debris management plan beforehand

The new C&D Waste policy which is set to be enforced in the city, will ensure that big builders submit an action plan for debris management at their site, even before a sanctioned plan for the project.

Subodh Yadav, Special Commissioner, SWM, said that the bulk generators had to make their own arrangements for the disposal of debris, which will be monitored by BBMP.

“While in many cases, C&D waste is reused at the site to refill pits and level land, the bulk generators are either free to give the waste to the recycle plants or dump them in the six stone quarry pits that will be notified soon,” he said.

Recent study by BBMP

City generates around 2500 tonnes of C&D waste per day

Presently no policy or organised channel collecting and disposing off this waste

June 28, 2012: UDD issued guidelines to all cities with a population of above 10 lakh to set up C&D Waste processing plants.

Proposed sites

Kannur, off Bande Hosuru Road to the north-east of the city

Mallasandra off Jalahalli West to the north of the city

Anjanapura to the west of the city

All three plants to be of 750 tonnes/day capacity

Total: 2250 tonnes/day

Those running the plant will have a fleet of trucks to pick up C&D waste from your doorstep for a price, within 48 hours of booking the vehicle.

What happens to the debris?

At the plant, the concrete part of the waste is separated both manually and using mechanised segregators

Magnetic separators are used to pick the metal

The concrete part of the waste will be crushed, washed to make cement kerbs, hollow bricks or manufactured sand

The plastic and wood waste will be sent for waste-to-energy plants

Metal is sold as scrap, thereby ensuring almost all waste is recycled and reused

“Each plant may require an investment of around Rs. 22 crore. While BBMP will provide the land, the private firm needs to invest on the machinery. The firm needs to share their profits with BBMP. The plants may be operational in another six months.” - Subodh Yadav, Special Commissioner, SWM, BBMP

“Recycling plants for C&D waste is the need of the hour. Most of the big builders reuse the debris on the site itself for levelling land and other such purposes. However, it’s the small projects in the unorganised sector, that so far have not had a channel of organised processing, which will be better served through these plants.” - Suresh Hari, secretary, CREDAI, Bengaluru


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Printable version | Sep 25, 2022 5:32:06 am | https://www.thehindu.com/news/cities/bangalore/finally-bengaluru-may-get-recycling-plants-for-construction-debris/article8432070.ece