Visakhapatnam

Visakhapatnam: waste segregation at source is very important, says award winning student

Naga Hamsa Deepthi Adiraju, who led the team, which won the first prize at the ‘Green Gurukul Challenge’, being felicitated by GVMC Commissioner G. Lakshmisha in Visakhapatnam recently.

Naga Hamsa Deepthi Adiraju, who led the team, which won the first prize at the ‘Green Gurukul Challenge’, being felicitated by GVMC Commissioner G. Lakshmisha in Visakhapatnam recently. | Photo Credit: BY ARRANGEMENT

The jingles played by the ‘CLAP’ (Clean Andhra Pradesh) vans, which come to collect wastes from the doorstep of residents in colonies, on segregation of wet and dry wastes, are a ‘wake up’ call not only for the ‘late risers’ but also create awareness about protection of environment.

Though most people understand the problem, they fail to comprehend its gravity. While some are under the wrong notion that it’s meant to ease the task of the workers, others wonder as to why they should segregate the wastes, when they are already paying taxes to the municipal corporation.

Naga Hamsa Deepthi Adiraju of Visakhapatnam, who led a 15-member team, which won the first prize at ‘The Green Gurukul Challenge’, a national-level competition, organised by the ‘Waste Warriors’ was felicitated by the Greater Visakhapatnam Municipal Corporation (GVMC) Commissioner G. Lakshmisha, at a programme organised here recently. The competition was organised from April to June last year.

The participants had to come out with solutions to problems faced by the people due to improper disposal of waste and to spread awareness among people. A total of 64 schools, from across 22 cities in the country, participated in the competition.

Deepthi always had a passion to do something for the environment and worked towards it in different ways like creating awareness among the people on plastic waste and role of waste segregation in solid waste management.

“During my visit to the garbage dumping yard, the workers told me about their difficulties in the manual segregation of wastes. Apart from being a tedious job, it also poses health risks to them. The non-segregation of wastes at the household-level was resulting in the piling up of garbage as the workers had to spend more time on segregation,” Ms. Deepthi told this correspondent.

Waste segregation at the household-level will enable production of manure, for the use of plants, in home compost pits. Kitchen wastes like discarded vegetables and banana skins can be used to make manure in the garden. This would result in recycling and thereby reduction of the wastes going to the dump yard.

Deepthi has several awards to her credit including the first prize by the Harvest Educational Transformational Solutions, an international organisation for her work towards society and environment in 2021-22, international merit plus medal in Spell Bee (2015-16), was awarded a proficiency certificate in the Book Reading Competition, organised by NSTL, and several other general proficiency awards. On her future plans, she spoke of her desire to propagate the concept of waste segregation on a larger scale.


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Printable version | Aug 23, 2022 1:00:16 am | https://www.thehindu.com/news/cities/Visakhapatnam/waste-segregation-at-source-is-very-important-says-award-winning-student/article65797421.ece