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Inscriptions from Pallava, Chola periods found

Updated - April 05, 2017 08:16 am IST

Published - April 04, 2017 09:46 pm IST - Tiruchi

The 11 inscriptions were found at a Sivan Temple at Azhakiyamanavalam

An inscription of the Nandivarma Pallava II copied from the Sivan Temple at Azhakiyamanvalam near Tiruchi.

Eleven inscriptions from Pallava and Chola periods were found at a Sivan Temple at Azhakiyamanavalam near Mannachanallur in the district by research scholars.

The inscriptions were found during a study conducted at the temple by R. Akila, Assistant Professor, Department of History, Arignar Anna Government Arts College, Musiri, and M. Nalini, Head, Department of History, Seethalakshmi Ramasamy College. According to R. Kalaikkovan, Director, Dr. M. Rajamanikkanar Centre for Historical Research, who examined the inscriptions, the earliest of the new finds were two inscriptions that belong to the 15th regnal year of Nandivarma Pallava II of 8th century CE inscribed on a stone tablet which has bas-relief impressions of a well formed trisul on one side and sickle, spiral knife and ‘thuratti’ on the other side.

The inscriptions on both sides register two different endowments made by two shepherds namely Manattul Araisan and Kuditali Kovanattan to light lamps in the temple, referred to as Merrali.

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Among the four inscriptions of Parantaka Chola I of 10th century CE, two register gifts of land made by two individuals, one from a temple musician and the other from a trader, Manikramam settled at Pachchil.

A third regnal year inscription of Rajakesari (Sundara Chola or Rajaraja I) throws light on the gift made by Nakkan Paavai alias Vallanaipaka Thalaikkoli, who considered herself as the daughter of the presiding deity of the temple.

A piece of land was purchased out of the 7 kalanju of gold she had gifted and the produce was used to light a day lamp in the temple. ‘Thalaikkoli’ was the highest distinction conferred on highly skilled temple dancers. It is equally interesting to note that three dancers of this temple were taken into the fold of the famous Thalichcheri Pendukal settled at the residential quarters of Rajarajisvaram at Thanjavur during the rule of the great king Rajaraja I.

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A fragmentary inscription of 9th century CE and another one, in which the name of the king is lost, record endowments made for lighting of a lamp at the temple. These eleven inscriptions have been copied by officials and the discovery of the new records has been informed to the authorities, Dr. Kalaikkovan said in a press release.

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