Madurai

‘Vembakottai expected to be most revealing archaeological site’

Minister for Industries, Tamil Culture and Archaeology Thangam Thennarasu formally inaugurates archaeological excavation at Vembakottai in Virudhunagar district on Wednesday.

Minister for Industries, Tamil Culture and Archaeology Thangam Thennarasu formally inaugurates archaeological excavation at Vembakottai in Virudhunagar district on Wednesday.

Vembakottai is expected to be "the most revealing archaeological site" as several Sangam-era artefacts were found during field exploration here, according to Minister for Industries, Tamil Culture and Archaeology Thangam Thennarasu.

After inaugurating excavation works at Uchimedu near here on Wednesday, Mr. Thennarasu said even microlithic tools were among the surface collections made at the site. "The findings suggest that the site could be at least 3,000 years old," he said.

A lot of evidences revealed that the site could be related from the iron age to the late Chola period. The Minister said shell bangles, terracotta ear ornaments, hop scotch stone and spindle whorls were found at the site.

Scientific study, including carbon dating of the artefacts, would be done to know about the historical importance of the site, he said. In the first phase, excavation would be done in 12 trenches in the archaeological mound that stretches over 25 acres along the left bank of Vaippar river.

The first phase will go on till September, according to Vembakottai Archaeological Site Director P. Baskar. Research scholars would be involved in the task, he said.

Virudhunagar Collector J. Meghanath Reddy, State Archaeological Department Director Sivanandam, Sivakasi Sub-Collector M. Birathiviraj, Sattur Revenue Divisional Officer Pushpa and Vembakottai Tahsildar Sundaramoorthi were present.


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Printable version | Jun 25, 2022 7:43:55 pm | https://www.thehindu.com/news/cities/Madurai/vembakottai-expected-to-be-most-revealing-archaeological-site/article65231191.ece