Hyderabad

Make products, applications affordable, IT graduates told

HYDERABAD, Telangana, 10/08/2019: International Institute of Information Technology(IIIT), Hyderabad celebrated its 18th convocation ceremony in Hyderabad on August 10, 2019. It graduated 477 students and a record number of 17 PhDs and 125 Masters with thesis. Photo: G. Ramakrishna / The Hindu

HYDERABAD, Telangana, 10/08/2019: International Institute of Information Technology(IIIT), Hyderabad celebrated its 18th convocation ceremony in Hyderabad on August 10, 2019. It graduated 477 students and a record number of 17 PhDs and 125 Masters with thesis. Photo: G. Ramakrishna / The Hindu

Information technology has a great impact on progress of medicine which makes the diagnosis of diseases accurate and digitised patient’s data and medical reports which can be accessed online from anywhere and referred to provide effective treatment to patients, said M.V.S. Valiathan, renowned professor of cardiac surgery.

Delivering the 18th convocation address of International Institute of Information Technology (IIIT) here on Saturday, Padma Vibhushan Valiathan who served as faculty at prominent university hospitals abroad and in India congratulated the graduating IIIT students and exhorted them to work for the country that was racing for the status of a developed country.

Medical devices worth ₹20,000 crore are being imported by India today and that is an indication of how technology is progressing. “As IT graduates, if you develop new technologies and applications, do make them affordable without compromising on the quality,” he said.

Technology-aided medicine in the form of latest diagnostic tools like imaging, CT scan and MRI scan can pin-point the diseased areas of various organs. Yet the medical technology should be patient-centric. The cost of modern medicine and diagnostic tools are a concern and progress of medical technology, he said, is inversely proportional to people’s ability to access it.

Dwelling on the way IT impacted every field, he said while it was the product of 20th century, technology itself was ancient. One heard of Susrutha who described centuries ago a large number of surgical operations and detailed about 120 surgical instruments that were made to given specifications of material and measurements. Yet, medical technology was different from information technology. While medical technology deals with tangible things, information technology is related to abstract things, and abstract knowledge was always considered superior to tangible knowledge, he said.

“Celebrate IT as a powerful tool but remember it is only a tool that should be used for the larger good,” he said. The electronic data revolution has been huge. But privacy and confidentiality of the patients are to be protected when there is a conflict between unprotected data, industrial use and individual autonomy, he said.

17 Ph.Ds awarded

A record number of 17 Ph.Ds and 125 masters with thesis were among the 477 students who graduated. Oatwek Chaitanya Pankaj Kumar (B.Tech, CSE) was awarded the IIIT gold medal in recognition of his outstanding academic performance. The B.Tech Best All-rounder awards were presented to Sreya Mittal and Pranav Bhasin of SCE. Nine students received programme gold medals.

A total of 117 companies registered for conducting placements and made job offers to the graduating students.


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Printable version | Oct 7, 2022 10:43:02 am | https://www.thehindu.com/news/cities/Hyderabad/make-products-applications-affordable-it-graduates-told/article28979247.ece