Hyderabad

A walk through the ages

Minister for Tourism A. Chandulal, Chief Advisor to Government Rajiv Sharma, Director of Department of Archaeology and Museums N.R. Visalatchy, Senior Advisor to TS Government B.V. Papa Rao and Tourism Secretary B. Venkatesham releasing a book at the inaugural of the seminar in Hyderabad on Friday.

Minister for Tourism A. Chandulal, Chief Advisor to Government Rajiv Sharma, Director of Department of Archaeology and Museums N.R. Visalatchy, Senior Advisor to TS Government B.V. Papa Rao and Tourism Secretary B. Venkatesham releasing a book at the inaugural of the seminar in Hyderabad on Friday.  

Panellists dwell on facts, figures and letters on Telangana’s heritage at a seminar at MCRHRD Institute

It was a walk back in time as panellist after panellist dug out facts, figures and letters on Telangana’s hoary heritage at ‘Telangana Through Ages: Perspectives from Early and Medieval Periods’ on Friday. The two-day seminar organised by Heritage Telangana got under way at MCRHRD Institute in the city. This is the second year in a row that Hyderabad is hosting a seminar on Telangana with participants from across the world sharing their papers and insights into the history of the land.

D. Raja Reddy set the tone of the first session when he spoke on the coin hoards found in various parts of the country, especially in Telangana. “The first hoard of Roman coins was found in 1787 in Telangana. We were taught that the history of the land begins with Satavahanas. But now we know that it begins with Ikshvakus, Nandas, Mauryas followed by Satavahanas,” said Dr. Reddy, a numismatist. “A large number of Roman and Byzantine coins were discovered in the peninsular region of India over the years. In Telangana, they were discovered in villages and towns near river banks and in places which were well-known Buddhist sites. The coins were found inland at places that were connected with maritime trade routes,” said Rebecca Darley of University of London, who used the coin collection at Department of Archaeology and Museums to reach her conclusion.

Interestingly, Ms. Darley posited that some of the coins were replicas. “Some of the coins dating back to the first century are imitations. Perhaps they were made for ritual or religious purpose,” said Ms. Darley using chronology clues as the Roman empire only began using gold coins from the second century onwards.

“Some of the epigraphical evidence from Nagarjunkonda points to well-developed medical facilities in the region, including rooms for women and children and a separate wing for treating fever,” said Penchala Prasad.

The seminar was inaugurated by Telangana Minister for Tourism, A. Chandulal.

Recommended for you
This article is closed for comments.
Please Email the Editor

Printable version | Jul 12, 2020 12:34:20 PM | https://www.thehindu.com/news/cities/Hyderabad/a-walk-through-the-ages/article22474770.ece

Next Story