Qatar World Cup 2022Messi: Angry for missing penalty, but Argentina came out stronger after my mistake

DU students make short film on Rohingya

Hope to raise awareness about the plight of refugees living in camps

December 05, 2017 02:04 am | Updated 02:44 pm IST - NEW DELHI

NEW DELHI, 21/11/2017: Women residents at a camp for Rohingya Muslims in Kalindi Kunj, in New Delhi on Tuesday. The Supreme Court today deferred its hearing in the case seeking directions against Centre’s move to deport Rohingya Muslims to December 5.  
Photo: Sandeep Saxena

NEW DELHI, 21/11/2017: Women residents at a camp for Rohingya Muslims in Kalindi Kunj, in New Delhi on Tuesday. The Supreme Court today deferred its hearing in the case seeking directions against Centre’s move to deport Rohingya Muslims to December 5. Photo: Sandeep Saxena

Ahead of the Supreme Court hearing on the Rohingya issue, a group of Delhi University students have made a short film highlighting the plight of the refugees in the country.

The 11-minute film, which uses ants as a metaphor to reflect the strained state of affairs that the refugees have been subjected to, has been shot in Kerala and the refugee camp in Delhi. The narration has been done by one of the refugees in the Rohingyan language.

“One needs to raise awareness surrounding the issue. When we first started shooting, many of our contemporaries seemed clueless about the crisis. Through the short film we hope to induce mass appeal which, in turn, will help in making a difference,” said Anson A. Athikalam, a third-year economics student from St. Stephens College, who has helmed and directed the film.

Titled ‘Upavahana’, which in Pali means ‘washing away’, the film is intended to make a strong impact in the mind’s of people and in the process shed light on an issue which is repeatedly being sidelined, said Mr. Anson.

‘Need sustained help’

“When we visited the refugee camp for shooting, we came across a number of refugees who complained that the help they get from people’s donation is extremely short lived. There is a sense of dismay as they feel that people come forward to help only for a day and then never return. What they need is a more sustained assistance,” said the director.

“Even in mainstream media, problematic statements have been made where certain people have said that the Rohingyas should not be ‘dumped’ on the nation. On the other hand, the living conditions for the refugees in the camps are in a pathetic state. Through the film, we hope to reach out to as many people as possible,” Mr. Anson added.

Lauding the efforts made by the students, Benston John, economics professor at St. Stephens College, said: “The film reflects the sincerity that the students have towards the cause. The choice of language stands out as well. However, I am sure the path will not be an uninterrupted one. I hope that colleges in Delhi University agree to screen the film so that there is at least some sort of discussion around the issue.”

Top News Today

Comments

Comments have to be in English, and in full sentences. They cannot be abusive or personal. Please abide by our community guidelines for posting your comments.

We have migrated to a new commenting platform. If you are already a registered user of The Hindu and logged in, you may continue to engage with our articles. If you do not have an account please register and login to post comments. Users can access their older comments by logging into their accounts on Vuukle.