Stones with 11th century ‘Grantham’, 16th century Tamil inscriptions discovered near Kangayam in Tamil Nadu

The stone slabs were found by the members of Virarajendran Archaeological and Historical Research Centre at the Lord Shiva and Lord Vishnu temples at Pazhnchervazhi village

January 23, 2024 06:24 pm | Updated 06:24 pm IST - TIRUPPUR

A Tiruppur-based team of archaeology enthusiasts has discovered stones with 11th century Grantham and 16th century Tamil inscriptions at temples under renovation near Kangeyam in Tamil Nadu.

A Tiruppur-based team of archaeology enthusiasts has discovered stones with 11th century Grantham and 16th century Tamil inscriptions at temples under renovation near Kangeyam in Tamil Nadu. | Photo Credit: Special Arrangement

A team from Tiruppur-based Virarajendran Archaeological and Historical Research Centre has discovered two stone inscriptions of ‘Grantham’ and Tamil dating 11th and 16th centuries respectively at Pazhnchervazhi village near Kangayam.

The stone slabs were found by the members of the centre, S. Ravikumar and K. Ponnusamy, at the Lord Shiva and Lord Vishnu temples where renovation work is under way.

The stone bearing 11th century ‘Grantham’ inscriptions, created by Tamils for writing North Indian language, was found half-buried in front of the Amman shrine inside the Siva Temple, Team Director Mr. Ravikumar said.

The stone of 220 cm height, 50 cm width and 20 cm thickness bears 60 cm graffitti marks and writings on all its four sides. The front side depicts two standing lamps, ‘trishul’, conch and moon symbols.

All the four sides depict repetition of words of ‘hrim’, ‘hushta’, ‘hushra’, ‘sham’ and ‘lam’ besides other graffiti marks, eminent Epigrapher and Historian Y. Subbarayalu said. These words denote that the ‘manthra’ stone was worshipped by people in the past for curing diseases, he added.

The stone bearing 16th century Tamil inscription was found half-buried inside the Vishnu temple. The stone measures 80 cm in height and 50 cm in width with 20 cm thickness. It bears descriptions in 12, nine and four lines on its three sides throwing light on the historical importance of people making pottery in the past.

The inscription says that during the 18th day of Tamil month ‘Masi’ of ‘Vilimpiya’ year, the village was governed by Sriman Kuppala Annarkal under Thimmarasan when a potter named Kuthar Sungam made a donation of four rupees for lighting the perpetual lamp in the Vishnu temple.

The notable aspect here is that the four rupees is the amount levied as tax for each wheel the potter makes, and lighting of lamp was meant to be continued until the moon exists, Mr. Ravikumar said, explaining that this was indicative of profitability of pottery-making. The style of inscription was indicative of the stone dating back to 16th century AD, he said.

The present day Pazhanchervazhi village, located eight km from Kangayam on the northern bank of River Noyyal, was known as ‘Pazhanhepali’ and ‘Pazhancherpalli’ in the medieval period when Shaivism, Vaishnavism and Jainism attained states of glory, said Mr. Ravikumar.

0 / 0
Sign in to unlock member-only benefits!
  • Access 10 free stories every month
  • Save stories to read later
  • Access to comment on every story
  • Sign-up/manage your newsletter subscriptions with a single click
  • Get notified by email for early access to discounts & offers on our products
Sign in

Comments

Comments have to be in English, and in full sentences. They cannot be abusive or personal. Please abide by our community guidelines for posting your comments.

We have migrated to a new commenting platform. If you are already a registered user of The Hindu and logged in, you may continue to engage with our articles. If you do not have an account please register and login to post comments. Users can access their older comments by logging into their accounts on Vuukle.