Food

‘We want to explore how design intersects with daily life’

Paper Planes kicks off its first event for the year, with a panel discussion on food security

Can design play a role in determining the future of our food? Contemporary design and lifestyle e-commerce platform, Paper Planes event, this weekend will try and answer that. That is, how can design and technology shape the way we produce our food and help us make a sustainable choice. “Design is about creative problem solving. Design thinking can be an aspect of almost everything we do and the things that we interact with in our daily lives,” says Nupur Joshi-Thanks, founder Paper Planes.

Thoughts on a plate: (left to right) Roshini Bajaj Sanghvi; Ramya Ramamurthy; Divya Karnad; and Himanshu Arteev

Thoughts on a plate: (left to right) Roshini Bajaj Sanghvi; Ramya Ramamurthy; Divya Karnad; and Himanshu Arteev  

Community model

From selling magazines to producing their own content was but a short leap. Their website joinpaperplanes.com focuses on design, design thinking and culture. “Paper Planes started five years ago with the idea of introducing people to passion-driven content from around the world. Since we are such a community-driven brand, exchange of ideas was very important to us. We decided to launch this property – Oddly Enough -- an offline series of events with the idea to meet ‘our people’ and extend the dialogue we have with them on our digital platform,” elaborates Joshi-Thanks.

‘We want to explore how design intersects with daily life’

Paper Planes hosted four editions of Oddly Enough last year, covering topics such as how to make an independent magazine, design and the city, and climate change. While these three editions were held in Mumbai, the fourth edition on the business of design was held in Ahmedabad. “We wanted to explore how design intersects with our daily life and make that a topic of conversation for each edition,” explains Joshi-Thanks.

Future tense

The fifth edition of Oddly Enough and the first one this year, will tackle the problem of food security. The panel comprises researchers and designers working in the food space. “We wanted to pick the aspect of food where we see a lot of innovation because that’s where design thinking plays a role. Where the innovation is actually going to matter is in how we grow our food, because that’s where we are seeing more challenging times ahead of us, whether it’s the lack of land to grow food or the kind of food we are eating or how our natural resources are depleting,” she elaborates.

‘We want to explore how design intersects with daily life’

On the panel are marine ecologist and co-founder of InSeason Fish Divya Karnad, permaculturist and co-founder of Ananas Design Himanshu Arteev, and Ramya Ramamurthy of The Good Food Institute India who co-hosts the podcast Feeding 10 Billion. Food writer Roshni Bajaj Sanghvi will moderate the panel.

Karnad’s InSeason Fish is a sustainable seafood initiative, which not only produces an annual seafood calendar but also works on-ground with fishermen and seafood consumers to promote sustainable fishing techniques. “We need to increase the diversity of what we are consuming, whether it’s seafood or plants. The more diverse our diet the better it is for our health and for the ecosystem,” she asserts. Arteev’s company works on ecological landscape design to create sustainable systems that grow food, conserve water, and restore soil. Ramamurthy is a Communications Specialist who works with scientists and entrepreneurs focused on creating affordable and accessible plant-based alternatives to animal protein. “If we are going to feed 10 billion of us by 2050, we need to find a more efficient way to make our protein. What to eat is a personal choice, but if you can eat something that’s as tasty and nutritious, and priced the same or cheaper than what’s available currently, that’s actually better for your health and that of the planet, then why not? That’s the kind of ecosystem we are trying to create so that consumers have a choice,” she emphasises.

Oddly Enough No. 5: Where Will Our Food Come From? will take place at 11 a.m. on March 15 at G5A, Mahalaxmi; passes at ₹ 500 from joinpaperplanes.com

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Printable version | Apr 8, 2020 8:47:57 AM | https://www.thehindu.com/life-and-style/food/we-want-to-explore-how-design-intersects-with-daily-life/article31052288.ece

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