Fashion

Past forward

Anju Modi is all set for India Couture Week   | Photo Credit: GRJGM

An integral part of the Indian fashion industry since 1990, Delhi-based fashion designer Anju Modi has succeeded in demonstrating that when it comes to having a flair for creating intricate design patterns, making bold statements and implementing out-of-the-box ideas, she shares the space with the country’s leading couturiers.

Adept at multitasking, Anju is designing heavy duty garments for filmmaker Sanjay Leela Bhansali’s ambitious venture Bajirao Mastani and producing contemporary dresses for the India Couture Week, slated to begin in the Capital on July 15.

What are your expectations from the India Couture Week?

Couture week, for me, is a week-long celebration of fashion. This couture week, my expectations are to see a greater inflow of creativity from our industry veterans and a showcase of the crafts and design-work that have become synonymous to each of the presenting designers.

Tell us about your collection in detail.

My upcoming collection titled ‘Manikarnika’ follows a theme recurrent through all my collections -- a woman at the epicentre of the thought and the design. This time, however, ‘Manikarnika’is symbolic of the reincarnation of the soul, which translates through the collection with the revival of some of the ancient design techniques. The colour palette mirrors the earthy, sepia tones like sand, old rose reminiscent of the past centuries. The rich jewel tones of burgundy, ruby, emerald, add to luxury.

Do you think the change of name to nomenclature of India Couture Week from the Delhi Couture Week has positive ramifications, as there would be no more segregation of designers from Mumbai and Delhi?

I think it is a very positive move. It will make the couture week a more inclusive event for our fellow designers from across the country – Delhi, Mumbai and even Calcutta. Although, I do believe that the idea of calling it Delhi Couture Week was not intended to segregate the industry, but irrespective, it is a much-welcomed change.

The media pays There is too much attention to the glamour part and less to the quality of the fabric, the richly embroidered garments, accessories and make-up. Even the designers have to take a backseat. What is your take on this?

Glamour, according to me, is a quick route to grasp the media attention, but in the end it is the quality that helps sustain that attention. A bad collection will receive flak and a good collection will always be praised – irrespective of the glamour and the ostentatious presentation that they are showcased with.


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Printable version | Jul 24, 2021 3:19:05 AM | https://www.thehindu.com/features/metroplus/fashion/past-forward/article6204040.ece

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