Music

Lucky Ali's awesome definition for music

If the riff of “O Sanam” still doesn’t let you sleep, it is the magic of Lucky Ali. Ali who emerged as a singing sensation in the late 90s, didn’t get into the playback sing routines and kept himself exclusive. The second son of actor Mehmood, known for his comic timing, Ali has multiple interests. An organic farmer, who works on the piece of land bought by his father for his sons, Ali continues to be a popular name in the stage circuit. In between, he sings for films that really appeal to him, the last being Tamasha. Before a live concert at Flyp@MTV in Connaught Place, we catch up with the tall, long haired singer in the green room.

Excerpts:

On his music and the indie music wave

Alisha Chenoy and Baba Sehgal were the ones who pioneered it. These I created a different kind of music. The only common element between me and them was that we were of the same age group. That is why experts put me in their category. I do not think my music is indie pop. My music is culmination of my growth within the country; whatever it has given me in terms of what I heard from its rich source of music and whatever I have gathered from its films. From all that exposure I created my kind of music. I did not follow any genre. It was there because we were making movies, we were making and recording music. I grew up watching great stalwarts of music like R. D. Barman, Kishoreda, Rafisahab, Laxmikant-Pyarelal and Madan Mohan. I would watch these big people work and would consider it an insult to them that there would be a musical term indie pop. It is seven notes; whatever makes your heart cry is music. Do not give it a genre; it is an expression.

On Sonu Nigam’s comment on noise pollution emanating from religious places

I do not know Sonu Nigam personally. I feel that he is my brother and if he feels disturbed, he is rich enough to make a sound proof house and not worry too much. It is a question about people’s faith. Nobody questions your faith; live life and let others live. The more you start speaking about such things; making such statements, bad karma starts affecting you. Nobody is going to stay on this earth forever. We do good things and move forward. We are forgiving. He is still my brother; I would like to hug him.

On his father, Mehmood

Very strict but full of love and advice for a better future like what to do when he would not be there in this world.

I was happy to see my father sing and get encouraged by him to sing. We led a normal family life like if we were are watching television and he liked a particular song, he would spontaneously start singing it. (He breaks into an impromptu Kannada song before asking if I hail from Karnataka?)

On his relationship with his father during his growing up years.

My relationship was tempestuous in the growing up years. Even though there was tempestuousness, it culminated into a beautiful father-son relationship. All the advice and guidance from him helped me.

On Mehmood’s film Dushman Duniya Ka on drug addiction in which the lead character was called Lucky.

It was not based on me. Of course, I smoked dope. Many smoked dope as 15 years ago they were selling it in shops across Bombay. Why are they vilifying me for smoking now? The problem is we listen to so many people speaking and we make a judgement based on that. It is so unfair to that individual.

On his new project

It is a big job to excite people. I am in the process of creating a different form of entertainment...almost like a live film. Normally, films are there but if they are shown live, how would you feel? This is the concept. It will be a live film show. It is in process, and lot of artistry and technology has gone into it.

 

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Printable version | Mar 7, 2021 8:01:07 AM | https://www.thehindu.com/entertainment/music/whatever-makes-your-heart-cry-is-music/article18350442.ece

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