Music

Experiments with sound

Valayapatti S. Malarvannan along with Rajkumar Bharathi presented ‘Nadhalaya Classical Ensemble’, a sangita mela of refined music at the Valayapatti Kashyap Naadhalaya Festival. Seven artistes, who participated in this odyssey presented fascinating aspects of our orchestral music. Rajkumar Bharati’s prowess as a noted composer came to the fore during the course of the performance.

Scoring for an orchestra involves assigning different parts of the composition to the various instruments in the ensemble. And he did this wonderfully. However, one could not spot him in the concert hall.

The presentation commenced with a Mallari in Gambhiranattai in Sankeerna Chapu (two kalai) – a composition of Valayapatti Malarvannan, rendered by J.B. Srutisagar (flute) and Karaikkal Venkatsubramanian (violin). Accompanied ably by Valaypatti (thavil), M.S. Venktasubrmanian (mridangam) and S. Hariharasubramanian (ghatam), it set the tone for the delightful three-hour fare. Tisra nadai and kalpanaswaras added to the beauty of the composition. Rajkumar Bharati’s Hamsadhwani composition, ‘Tha thi thom nam tha’ was rendered by the vocal duo — Vasudha Ravi and Savitha Sriram. It had only solkattu passages and swaras, and no lyrics.

The kalpanaswarams were marked by rhythmic harmony. This was followed by Tyagaraja’s ‘Vandanamu Raghunandana’ (Sahana) on the flute and violin with kalpanaswaras and the percussionists offering alternate accompaniment.

‘Seshachala Nayakam’ (Varali – Rupakam) was gracefully presented by the vocal duo, accompanied by the five-member group. The niraval and swaras at ‘Aravindapatra nayanam’, (Atheetha eduppu) were awe-inspiring and the concluding swara korvai reached an exciting crescendo. The main attraction of the concert was the Dwijavanthi creation ‘Ri ga ma pa dha ma ga ri’ (chatusra triputa – two kalai) of Rajkumar Bharathi. The Pallavi, four aksharas and anupallavi two aksharas after samam brought out the composer’s firm grounding in laya. The rasikas at the Narayana Pravachana Mantapam, Nanganallur, seemed to enjoy the alternating effect of voice and instruments in the ragamalika swaras.

The thani highlighted the varied dimensions of rhythm. Aggressive sometimes and reposeful at chatusra, tisra and khanda nadais, Valayapatti Malarvannan showed his distinct style of accompanying vocal and instrumental music and in thani. He also knows how to blend and effect pauses to highlight the richness of the kriti. Venkatasubramanian and Hariharasubramanian vied with each other to match the thavil, which obviously dominated the thani and the concert.

A ragamalika Mira bhajan rendered by Vasudha Ravi and Savitha Sriram had a divine appeal. Their melodic contribution to the success of the concert was immense. ‘Seethakalyana Vaibhogame’ on the flute was soulful. The concert concluded with a thillana composed by Rajkumar Bharathi in Karnataka Devagandhari. The concert showed how diverse instruments can come together to create a symphony.

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Printable version | Aug 8, 2020 12:28:13 AM | https://www.thehindu.com/entertainment/music/marked-by-rhythmic-harmony/article25899168.ece

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