Movies

‘Bombairiya’ review: Confusion confounded

Same old: Radhika Apte in Bombairiya

Same old: Radhika Apte in Bombairiya  

The messy multiple narrative film gets strangled by its various strands

Disparate dwellers of Mumbai, at various critical junctures of their lives, thrown together by circumstances and becoming determinants in each others lives and destinies. This kind of multiple stories device has been used time and again in cinema to great effect. Bombairiya, however, is a call to give it a long, if not permanent, rest in Bollywood. Its use in the film feels entirely needless; to appear smart and slick but actually doing nothing more than unleashing uncalled-for chaos in the name of cool cinema.

Bombairiya
  • Director: Pia Sukanya
  • Starring: Radhika Apte, Akshay Oberoi, Adil Hussain, Ravi Kishan, Amit Sial, Shilpa Shukla
  • Storyline: A film star, his politician wife, publicist girlfriend, one crazy fan, a nice boy and his middle class family, cops and crooks, sharp-shooters and encounter specialists, some RDX let loose in Mumbai and a witness protection programme up for debate on TV. Go figure!

A film star, his politician wife, publicist girlfriend, one crazy fan, a nice boy and his middle class family, cops and crooks, sharp-shooters and encounter specialists, some RDX let loose in Mumbai and a witness protection programme up for debate on TV. There are the Mumbai streets and slums, the Bandra Worli Sealink, a VVIP jail cell, a FM station, a Brahmakumari ashram. As to what all these people, settings and things add up to – it’s all utter confusion. To begin with you do some math and try to map stuff out in your head even though there is no evident system to the script. You also laugh along with some senior citizen characters--the publicist’s father and grandmother and the kooky parents of the boy she stumbles into in her so-called adventure. There is a good ensemble at the director’s disposal but how long can the actors keep things afloat with their presence and performance? After a while, when nothing seems to hold, you give up on the senseless drivel and just let the images roll on without attempting to engage with anything on screen.

After starting off by complicating things with the various strands, towards the end the filmmaker unties them all, giving a long explanation of what transpired and how over the one and a half hour of screen time. Then why couldn’t it have been told straight and simple? Also, by then its already too late, the strands having strangled the film.

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Printable version | May 31, 2020 10:48:12 PM | https://www.thehindu.com/entertainment/movies/bombairiya-review-confusion-confounded/article26034384.ece

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