Assam

assam socio economic

image/svg+xml Note: Figures are percentages and may not total 100 due to rounding; fgures outside parentheses are for 2021 and fgures within are for 2016. In order to compare with 2021, the fgures for 2016 are the combined percentages of the current Mahajot alliance of Congress-AIUDF-BPF-Left parties even though the parties fought that election separately. For NDA too, the 2016 fgures are based on the current alliance and not the one back then Mahajot NDA AJP-RD Others Women 42 (49) 45 (39) 4 8 (13) Men 45 (48) 44 (38) 6 6 (14) Up to 25 yrs 53 (51) 38 (35) 3 5 (14) 26-35 yrs 47 (46) 43 (39) 7 4 (15) 36-45 yrs 39 (51) 50 (35) 5 5 (14) 46-55 yrs 39 (48) 45 (39) 4 11 (13) 56 yrs and above 40 (48) 45 (42) 4 10 (10) Non-literate 53 (63) 37 (22) 3 8 (15) Up to Primary 48 (55) 39 (32) 4 9 (14) Up to Matric 40 (42) 49 (43) 6 5 (15) College and above 27 (36) 58 (56) 10 6 (8) Poor 53 (47) 39 (37) 3 6 (17) Lower Class 46 (55) 44 (31) 3 6 (14) Middle Class 36 (48) 48 (40) 7 9 (12) Rich 26 (37) 57 (56) 14 4 (7) Rural 45 (52) 43 (33) 5 7 (15) Urban 27 (26) 67 (67) 2 5 (7) Socio-economic factors Apart from religious polarisation, education, class and location were most likely to decide if voters would choose Mahajot or NDA. While the Mahajot was stronger among the poor, the NDA got a major share of votes from the middle and upper classes. However, among lower-income groups, the share of both alliances was almost equal. The NDA also had a huge lead over the Mahajot among urban voters. Further, the higher the access to education, greater was the support for the NDA in that group. But the fgures must be read with a caveat—as high as three-fourths (72%) of Mahajot’s votes have come from Muslims, while the NDA’s vote bank consists largely of Hindus (86%)