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BharatSthali decodes the weaving story of Maheshwari Sarees

Our Indian handlooms have an artistic and handcrafted touch, making them a very promising field. On the sacred Narmada River banks, Maheshwar is a royal town; it is among the historical fort where the Holkar dynasty ruled for years, and the settlement of traditional Maheshwari fabric weavers are just a few of the eclectic fusions that make Maheshwar a more multi-dimensional and respected location to visit in Madhya Pradesh. The brand BharaSthali has garnered a lot of support from India and has grown in popularity. The label aspires to revitalize the professional life of craftsmen and their families by resurrecting the diversity of Indian Handloom from various parts of the country through its start-up.

One of the oldest handlooms

Maheshwar has been a centre for handloom weaving since the 5th century, but it rose to prominence under the reign of Rani Ahilyabai Holkar, a powerful Maratha queen (1767-1795). The ancient weaving setup is thought to have been mentioned in Kautilya’s Arthshastra. The smooth Maheshwari fabric is made with silk and cotton threads, giving it a gentle texture and is ideal for summer.

Talking about the origin of the Maheshwari sarees, the founder of BharatSthali stated, “Ahilya Bai is credited with designing the first Maheshwari saree. In 1760, the queen, a designer, recruited skilled handloom weavers from Surat and Mandu to work for her empire. They were tasked with making turban fabric and a unique nine-yard nauvari saree for the girls of the Malwa court to wear and offer as gifts to the royal guests. Maheshwari sarees have long been known for their subtlety and great quality and dignity and elegance.”

Foundation of the Rehwa Society, Maheshwari resurrected

BharatSthali too is playing a significant role in it through its contribution to the realm. Due to the introduction of factories and new, low-cost clothing to the market, the weaving heritage steadily faded! Richard Holkar and Sally Holkar, Maharaja Yeshwant Rao Holkar II’s son and daughter-in-law are credited with bringing Maheshwari sarees back to life. In 1979, the pair founded the Rehwa Society, a non-profit organization dedicated to reviving the centuries-old tradition of weaving Maheshwari sarees, dupattas, and dress material. There are roughly 250 weavers, and over 1500 looms in the society now.

Infused with unique designs and patterns

Previously, Maheshwari sarees were crafted from the finest cotton yarns and featured motifs inspired by the exquisite carvings on Maheshwar’s fort and temples. Newer and more graceful motifs, such as rui Phool (cotton flower), chameli (jasmine), Hans (swan), and heera, are embossed on the saree fabric, which is now made using a blend of Coimbatore cotton and Bangalore silk yarns (diamond). The saree features a reversible border and the aanchal’s signature five stripes. Despite this, the border is usually made with Surat zari thread. Some of the colors used in weaving are tapkeer (dark brown), aamras (golden yellow), and angoori (grape green).

BharatSthali is one such company that entered the handloom business to affect India’s weavers. It began with a crew of just two weavers and has since grown to include over 5000 weavers. In just three years, the saree brand has grown to a market capitalization of ten crores and comfortably serves thousands of consumers each month through retail and online sales.

Our Indian handlooms contain an aspect of art and workmanship, making them a very promising area. The brand has garnered a lot of support from India and has grown in popularity. The label aspires to revitalize the professional life of craftsmen and their families by resurrecting the diversity of Indian Handloom from various parts of the country through its start-up.

“This is a company press release that is not part of editorial content. No journalist of The Hindu was involved in the publication of this release.”


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Printable version | Jun 20, 2022 11:32:00 am | https://www.thehindu.com/brandhub/pr-release/bharatsthali-decodes-the-weaving-story-of-maheshwari-sarees/article65387722.ece