• Based on a mix of secondary sources, eyewitness accounts of Sikhs (written originally in Persian) as well as translations from Braj and Punjabi, Sarbpreet Singh writes a history of the subcontinent in the 18th century in Cauldron, Sword and Victory: The Rise of Sikhs (Penguin). This is the second volume; Singh’s first volume on the subject retold the history of Sikh Gurus. Now, he turns his attention to Guru Gobind Singh, the emperors of Delhi and the ambitious Nadir Shah.
  • Inheritance: The Evolutionary Origins of the Modern World (Penguin) by Harvey Whitehouse explores how evolutionary inheritance, shaped by millennia of natural and cultural selection, continues to influence human behaviour and societal development. From the origins of agriculture to the complexities of modern geopolitics, Whitehouse’s research offers insights into the forces driving human history and the challenges.
  • After a decade, Vikas Swarup is out with his new novel The Girl With The Seven Lives (Simon&Schuster). He tells the story of 25-year-old Devi who has been kidnapped, and is being held hostage at a dimly-lit basement by a masked gunman. He wants her to tell all about her misdemeanours, and threatens to put her life up for an online auction, where the highest bidder will determine her fate.
  • Tongueless (Hachette) by Lau Yee-Wa, translated by Jennifer Feeley, revolves around the lives of Wai and Ling, who are secondary school Chinese language teachers in Hong Kong, but crumble when there is a forced transition from using Cantonese to Mandarin as a medium of instruction. The Hong Kong writer, who has studied Chinese language and literature, won the Hong Kong Champion Award for Creative Writing in 2016 for her short story, ‘The Shark’.