Now that the Supreme Court has ordered a probe by Justice B.N. Srikrishna into the February 19 violence in the Madras High Court, it will be wise and appropriate on the part of lawyers and the police to stop the blame game and for the lawyers to resume their duties.

P. U. Krishnan,

Udhagamandalam

* * *

The assurance by the Chief Justice of India that the interests of the lawyers would be taken care of is welcome.

If it is proved that the police first resorted to lathicharge, they must be punished as they attacked not only lawyers, judges and the people in the court but also the judicature which is an organ of the state.

Md. Tarique Iqbal,

New Delhi

* * *

The February 19 incident should lead to the formulation of rules for police behaviour. The police are an overburdened and dejected lot. Their duties should involve only policing. Duties such as VIP security should be maintained by forces like the CISF.

The High Court episode should not be forgotten once the compensation is paid to the injured. We have to ask ourselves why, during any strike or protest, the police attack innocent people. Why did they also attack the passive advocates and litigants on the High Court premises?

P. Srimano,

Madurai

* * *

There can be no two opinion that policemen indulge in excesses wherever they take place. But it is also true that the legal profession has been penetrated by undesirable elements. The Supreme Court should address the crux of the problem to find a lasting solution. It should discipline the erring lawyers and make them realise that they cannot take the law into their own hands.

Buying peace with one section at the cost of the other will only result in simmering discontent among the one at the receiving end.

G. Kulandaivelu,

Panruti

* * *

The Supreme Court has rightly asked the Tamil Nadu government who gave the orders to the police to enter the High Court and under whose orders they resorted to a lathicharge. Some months ago, when there was violence in the Chennai law college, the question the police faced was quite the opposite. They were asked whether they needed permission to intervene when a group of students was assaulting a fellow student right in front of them.

R. Venkataramani,

Chennai

* * *

It is strange that the Bar Council of India has ignored the conduct of some of its own members and taken a partisan stance to defend its fraternity. What was wrong with the police taking action against the advocates who indulged in assault and arson?

It is wrong to blame the police for every conflict. It is also improper to describe what happened on the court premises as an assault on the judicial system. It is obvious that the legal community is trying to corner the police who did their duty. If the dangerous trend is allowed to prevail, it will spell doom for the rule of law.

Ananda Murti Vemuri,

Visakhapatnam

* * *

A court is a place where justice is granted; it is also a place that needs to be respected and honoured. How could such a huge police force enter the High Court without the permission of the acting Chief Justice or the Registrar-General? If the police could unleash such force on lawyers, imagine the plight of the common man. It is unfortunate that the police do not understand their responsibility.

Thamarai Manalan,

Perinthalmanna

* * *

This refers to Justice V.R. Krishna Iyer’s statement that if the Commissioner of Police, Chennai, and the Director-General of Police are not suspended in connection with the February 19 violence, the judges should resign en masse. One would have been happy if he had also advised lawyers not to indulge in vandalism.

What if a super cop issues a statement saying all police personnel should stop reporting for work en masse till action is taken against the lawyers?

R. Murali,

Coimbatore

* * *

While there can be no argument supporting the brute force used by the police in the court, it is also important to see what led to the situation. A verdict cannot be delivered without even giving a chance to the other side to present its case.

K.R.A. Narasiah,

Chennai

* * *

Under which law is permission required for the police to enter a public office to control unlawful assembly and rioting? For which offence is the suspension of the DGP and the CoP being demanded? When a Commission has been instituted to go into the incident, it is but reasonable to wait for its findings.

K. Radhakrishnan,

Chennai

* * *

If the police are expected to maintain calm even after a police station is set on fire, there is no point in maintaining a police force.

It is worth bearing in mind that the police are not an agency loved by the common man, but in the present case the people feel that the police are right.

S.M. Alexander,

Thiruvananthapuram

* * *

While seeking the details of the police action on the court premises, the fact that they could not but act to put out the fire in the police station to prevent other consequential damages to property cannot be ignored. It is also a reality that the police have to use force to maintain order under testing circumstances.

P.R. Thiruvengadam,

Coimbatore