This refers to the Tamil Nadu Chief Minister’s reply to a question on the continuing boycott of courts by lawyers — that it was an issue between the court and the lawyers (March 16). Had he said that he would use his good offices to end the crisis, we would have been happier. His remark that the issue is between the advocates and the court shows his utter unconcern for the judiciary, which stands paralysed by the atrocious and outrageous attack by the police. Forging an electoral alliance may be his immediate concern and necessity. But even more important is paying attention to and resolving the problem created for the judiciary in the State which has been crippled by the unruly police who are under his control. Instead of shirking his responsibility and dodging the issue, the Chief Minister should take action against the unruly police on the basis of the Srikrishna Committee report, which has indicted the police for their unruly action on the Madras High Court premises on February 19. That alone would end the boycott of courts by lawyers.

N.G.R. Prasad & S. Ayyathurai,

Chennai

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The news that the litigants have started defending their cases in the Madras High Court is unfortunate. The litigants do not know the complicated legal procedures and the law involved in their cases, which is why they approach the lawyers to represent them. Lawyers should show some sense of responsibility.

K. Rajakrishnan,

Kannur

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The lawyers’ strike has made way for two silent revolutions. One, the judges of the Madras High Court have come forward to hear cases in Tamil in view of the personal appearance of petitioners. Second, it has paved the way for the common people — who have always hesitated to enter the court precincts even as a witness — to appear and argue their cases in person, setting aside their reservations.

G. Kannapiran,

Chennai