The article, “Forget about Incredible India, can we have a Clean India?” (Open Page, May 23), reflects our lack of civic sense — a major handicap in projecting our country as an ideal place to live in. Many people, including those from the “educated classes,” behave as though littering is their birthright. Municipal agencies can do a better job of keeping a city clean only if people dispose of waste at designated places.

Y. Suresh,

Hyderabad

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We have to admit that as a nation we are casual about and indifferent to dirt, its consequences and disposal. The younger generation should be taught about cleanliness and its significance in schools and colleges. One of the most unfortunate things is that the educated and the well-placed are indifferent to cleanliness. Indians follow all the rules of the host countries when they go abroad but revert to their habit of spitting and fouling up their surroundings on their return home.

H.N. Ramakrishna,

Michigan

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The filthy conditions at bus stations in various States are shining examples of misuse by people and apathy on the part of authorities. Canteens at the bus stations are unclean and the food served there is unhygienic. Corporation schools do not have usable toilets and the campuses have been turned into dumping grounds. Railway coaches are not provided with sufficient water in toilets.

H.K. Lakshman Rao,

Chennai

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Lack of public toilets in cities means men continue to use anything vertical as a urinal. This habit cuts across all sections. Cities do not become clean with the laying of granite sidewalks and construction of parks. Timely garbage clearance, preferably in the early hours of the morning or late at night, is an important factor. Sanitation workers should be paid more to work at odd hours.

A. Tamizh Anbu,

Chennai

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The responsibility of keeping cities clean lies with all of us. It is not necessary to create a forum or conduct campaigns. We can contribute in simpler ways. Like confronting persons who spit on the road or litter. The worst the person can do is pick up a quarrel with you. But if the person heeds what you say, you will have given back something to society.

T. Sampath,

Chennai