The attack by some Christian groups on a theatre in Hyderabad where the film The Da Vinci Code was to be released is highly deplorable. Taking the law into one's hands is not only unjust but also clearly against the basic tenets of Christianity. Those who indulge in such vandalism should realise that in a secular country like India, no group has the right to impose its ideas on others in the name of religion.

D. Samuel Lawrence,
Madurai, T.N.

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Protesting against the screening of the film after the High Court verdict amounts to protesting against democracy. If the Andhra Pradesh Government fails to give protection to theatres that want to screen the movie, it will be in breach of the law.

Ch. Komal Kishore,
Hyderabad

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Do the attackers really believe that a piece of fiction will make people lose faith in Christianity?

Avinash Vasudevan,
Chennai

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The disrupters have done more harm to the cause of Christ than any number of Da Vinci Codes can. Jesus did not teach his followers to resort to violence. For 2000 years, Christianity has survived more serious threats and does not need misguided religious enthusiasts to protect it.

P.T. George & V.O. Cherian,
Secunderabad

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Christianity has spread all over the world because of its resilience and tolerance. Christians should understand that a movie that has been made with an ulterior motive cannot belittle their religion in any way.

C. Adrian Royen,
Chennai

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The argument that the film has altered history is quite hollow, as it carries a disclaimer that it is a pure work of fiction. The larger picture of intolerance, in India and abroad, is disturbing. There is no doubt that some works will cause public outrage. But what defines a civilised society is its ability to keep intolerance and the factors precipitating it in check.

Sarath Madhavan,
Thrissur, Kerala