SEARCH

Drinking water scarcity hits government hospital

Staff Reporter
print   ·   T  T  

A new tank will be constructed, says Dean

People wait in queue to collect water from the only drinking water tap in the Government Mohan Kumaramangalam Medical College Hospital in Salem on Monday. —PHOTO: P. GOUTHAM
People wait in queue to collect water from the only drinking water tap in the Government Mohan Kumaramangalam Medical College Hospital in Salem on Monday. —PHOTO: P. GOUTHAM

When the city residents are receiving drinking water once in 15 days, patients and visitors at the Government Mohan Kumaramangalam Medical College Hospital are not exempted.

This could be felt as a long queue can be seen waiting from early morning to fetch water, from the only drinking water tap available on the hospital premises, near the Super Speciality Hospital.

But as the day progresses people, who come to take water, have to return empty-handed due to non-availability of water in the tank.

The hospital, referral hospital for seven nearby districts, treats around 5,000 outpatients everyday with 1,700 as inpatients as on Monday.

A total of 14,500 visitors come to the hospital everyday to visit those admitted or accompany the outpatients. The current everyday requirement of the hospital is about one lakh litres and the corporation supplies about 70,000 litres leaving a shortage of 30,000 litres.

To face the situation, the hospital administration has arranged another 20,000 litres from a private party. All the 10 borewells on the hospital premises have gone dry long ago and in the prevailing summer season, the water requirement goes up as the supply remains same.

An engineer at the hospital said that the capacity of the drinking water tank, sponsored in 2007, is limited and water has to be pumped from the storage tank to the drinking water tank when it goes dry.

Hence, many a times the tank is left empty and the requirements of the people are left unfilled.

A visitor said that they could not buy water bottles from shops that costs around Rs. 15 per litre and wanted the tank to be filled with adequate water.

Dean Dr. R. Vallinayagam told The Hindu that to mitigate the drinking water problem the hospital administration had planned to purchase another two to four tankers of water which would be around 30,000 litres. “Since one tank with a tap is inadequate for the whole hospital, another tank would be constructed with the help of sponsorship,” he added.

More In: TAMIL NADU | NATIONAL
The Hindu presents the all-new Young World

O
P
E
N

close

Recent Article in TAMIL NADU