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Clampdown at no parking zones in Madurai

Special Correspondent
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Police to clamp wheels of vehicles at no parking zones with a lock as part of tough measures to regulate traffic

CRACKING THE WHIP: Commissioner of Police P. Balasubramanian (second from right) looking at wheel clamp locked on a car in the city on Thursday. — Photo: K. Ganesan
CRACKING THE WHIP: Commissioner of Police P. Balasubramanian (second from right) looking at wheel clamp locked on a car in the city on Thursday. — Photo: K. Ganesan

Next time when you park your vehicle in a ‘no parking' zone, the police may clamp the wheel with a lock.

Only after paying the fine with the traffic police, the vehicles — be it two, three or four wheelers — can be moved away from the spot.

Any attempts to move the vehicle by the owner/driver with the lock may damage the tyres.

Commissioner of Police P. Balasubramanian handed over the wheel clamp locks to the traffic police as part of the Road Safety Week here on Thursday. He said that the police had been instructed to ensure free flow of vehicle movement at major thoroughfares and intersections.

With rise in vehicle population, the police had to take tough measures to discipline the motorists in many aspects. Hence, it had been decided to impose fine on vehicles parked in ‘no parking' zones with immediate effect.

He appealed to the vehicle users not to park in ‘no parking' zones and avoid fines and help in smooth flow of traffic in the city.

Deputy Commissioner of Police (Traffic) J. Rajendran said that for a vehicle parked in a ‘no parking' area, the wheel would first be locked with a clamp by the police. A sticker informing the driver that the vehicle had been clamped under Section 127 of the CMV Act would be pasted on the windscreen of the four-wheeler. The driver could contact telephone number 103 or 100 following which the police would come to the spot and release the lock and the driver could take away the vehicle after remitting the fine.

Orphans get footwear

Footwear for 67 girl children, majority of them orphan, studying in a Corporation school were presented at another function got up as part of the Road Safety Week here on Thursday.

Commissioner of Police P. Balasubramanian said that students must avoid travelling on footboard of buses. Though the fatal accidents in Madurai had been coming down from 142 deaths in 2008 to 125 in 2009 and 112 in 2010, the police wanted 2011 to be an accident-free year.

It could be possible only with the cooperation of motorists.

Deputy Commissioner of Police (Law and Order) R. Chinnaswamy said that youth were the future of the nation.

“The country needs you. Hence, loss of a life at a young age would be a loss to the nation. Youngsters must be more careful on roads as a majority of them had been driving fast on two-wheelers which may either take away their lives or claim the lives of some other road user, he said.

Deputy Commissioner of Police (Traffic) J. Rajendran said that overloading auto-rickshaws with school children would be dealt with seriously. He urged the parents to come forward voluntarily and help police in solving the problem. The claims by many parents that it was economical to share a crowded auto-rickshaw are wrong. “Consider the safety of your children first,” he said.

State Bank of India Regional Manager G. Ramanujam lauded the initiatives of the city police in regulating traffic. He also volunteered to donate a set of uniforms to all the 67 orphans studying in a Corporation school.

The city police, in association with Kalyani Honda and Aravind Eye Hospital, conducted a free eye screening camp for school children at A.R. Kalyana mandapam. Out of the 67 children screened, five were given free spectacles.

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