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Rain, traffic jams play spoilsport for university admission seekers

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STRANDED: Commuters caught in the heavy rain which lashed several parts of New Delhi on Tuesday . PHOTO: R.V. MOORTHY
STRANDED: Commuters caught in the heavy rain which lashed several parts of New Delhi on Tuesday . PHOTO: R.V. MOORTHY

Staff Reporter

Rush at the payment counters at most colleges started only after 10 a.m., but counters kept open up to 2 p.m.

`We had to send about 50 students back because they came much after 2 p.m.'Hoping to get a better course somewhere, parents and students were seen looking at the list once again

NEW DELHI: The rain might have cooled the weather in the Capital, but for students trying to make their way to colleges on the first day of payment of fees at Delhi University on Tuesday, it was far from good news. Battling heavy rain and traffic jams, the rush at the payment counters at most colleges started only after 10 a.m.

"Though the counters opened at 9-30 a.m., students started coming in as late as 10-15 a.m. But we kept our counters open till 2 p.m. Already 250 to 300 students have paid their fees. We had to send about 50 students back because they came much after 2 p.m.,'' said Manasvini Yogi, Media Coordinator of Indraprastha College.

With students being asked to go in alone to the different rooms at Hindu College, parents hung around patiently keeping their fingers crossed and constantly calling up to give family members at home updates on the situation.

"I have been waiting for over an hour and my daughter will take another half an hour. The whole process takes time. You have to go from counter to counter,'' said Reema Ray who had accompanied her daughter for the admission.

While there were those who wanted to be the first to pay the admission fees to secure their chance in the college of their choice, there were others who preferred to explore all the options before paying the fees. Hoping to get a better course somewhere, parents and students were seen looking at the list once again trying to figure out how to squeeze in to a course.

"My son wants to do B.A. programme, which he has missed by one per cent. But he qualifies for History (Honours). Now I have to persuade him to opt for History. He will probably make it in the second list, but this is blackmail really, so we are being forced to pay up to make sure he gets in,'' said Mohammad Naseem.

With Commerce students rushing to find space in any college, as the cut-off marks required are formidable this year, colleges found that many students came in on the first day to pay the fees for this course. Gargi College has already filled up its allotted seats for B.Com. (Honours) on Tuesday. "There have been 470 admissions on the first day, which is a tremendous response as we have about 500 seats for the general category. We are really worried about Commerce, as other colleges have really high cut-off marks and since ours are realistic, the quota of the seats are already filled up,'' said Gargi College Principal Meera Ramachandran.

And with Delhi University ensuring that all those who meet the cut-off must be accommodated, no college can refuse to admit students.

Hans Raj College has seen a similar trend. Over 200 students were admitted on the first day and 45 of these were Commerce students. "We had to send 15 students back, as it was closing time,'' said Principal S.K Arora.

Acharya Narendra Dev -- essentially a Science College -- also saw a rush for admission to a seat in Commerce. "There were 75 admissions on the first day. Of these, 30 were from Commerce alone,'' said Acharya Narendra Dev Principal Savithri Singh.

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