Manisha Jha

The plant will be able to generate 16 MW of energy per day, says ILFS

NDMC would be providing the land of its now defunct compost plant site at Okhla

The civic body is expected to save up to Rs.2.25 crore per annum on account of landfill charges

NEW DELHI: After being in the pipeline for the past two years, the New Delhi Municipal Council is now ready to set up an integrated waste treatment complex at the Okhla compost plant site as a public-private partnership project for scientific disposal of municipal solid wastes.

Designed to take advantage of developments in the field of waste processing technologies, the project to be undertaken in partnership with the Municipal Corporation of Delhi entails pre-treatment of the wastes and its controlled combustion to generate energy to be provided to BSES using integrated technologies.

After signing a Memorandum of Understanding with Infrastructure Leasing and Financial Services in August 2005, the civic body is now gearing up to award the contract to a private operator after finalising the tendering process by next month.

While this operator would be responsible for development, construction, operation and maintenance of the plant, the NDMC would be providing the land of its now defunct compost plant site at Okhla along with a commitment to provide 200 metric tonnes of municipal solid wastes, the rest being contributed by the MCD.

According to ILFS, the plant will be able to generate 16 MW of energy per day by processing 2,000 metric tonnes solid wastes, which is of 25 per cent of the total solid waste generated in Delhi per day.

After obtaining the necessary approvals from the concerned ministries and Government organisations, a concession agreement specifying the rights and obligations of each party has been finalised and approved by the NDMC in October.

After the manual completion of the plant within 24 months, the civic body is expected to save up to Rs. 2.25 crore per annum on account of landfill charges paid by the NDMC to the MCD. It would also be gaining revenue from the sale of energy. Presently the civic body generates about 290 metric tonnes of municipal solid waster per day and is dependant on the MCD for provision of landfill sites for its disposal.

Said an NDMC official: “It is difficult to dispose growing wastes through limited landfill sites which have their own technology limitations and associated environment risks such as contamination of ground water among others.”

“Since the waste is not homogenous, each waste type has to be treated differently. This requires pre-processing and use of a combination of technologies to treat the different waste types which will be provided at this plant. Refuse Derived Fuel and Bio-Methanisation technology for bio-degradable waste are among the technologies to be employed in the plant ,” added ILFS Project Manager, Deepak Gupta.

More In: NEW DELHI | NATIONAL