SEARCH

Residents set an example for waste management

Thrissur Bureau
print   ·   T  T  

Plant uses eco-friendly method of waste degradation

Local touch:A Thumburmuzhy Model Aerobic Composting Technique plant set up at the Postal and BSNL quarters at Poothole in Thrissur.—Photo: K. C. Sowmish
Local touch:A Thumburmuzhy Model Aerobic Composting Technique plant set up at the Postal and BSNL quarters at Poothole in Thrissur.—Photo: K. C. Sowmish

Residents of Postal and BSNL Staff Quarters have set an example for other apartment complexes in the city by installing a waste management plant.

Mayor I. P. Paul inaugurated the Thumboormuzhi Model Aerobic Composting Technique (TMACT) plant at a function held at the quarters on Sunday.

The other speakers included Therambil Ramakrishnan, MLA, C. S. Sreenivasan, chairman of Corporation Health Standing Committee; M. B. Ravichandran, Principal General Manager, BSNL, Saramma Robson, Councillor, T. N. Jagadeesh Kumar, coordinator of LAMPS project; Indira Gopinath, K. Jayalakshmi, Vasanthi Gopal and S. Denni, Secretary of welfare association.

The Thumboormuzhi Model Aerobic Composting Technique (TMACT) was developed by Francis Xavier, Professor at Thumboormuzhi Cattle Breeding Farm of Kerala Veterinary and Animal Sciences University.

The TMACT was approved by the United Nations among the four ideal rural technologies for farmers in India.

“The TMACT is an eco-friendly treatment plant. Since the aerobic method is used, degradation of waste occurs instead of decay. Degradation avoids foul smell and health hazard bacteria,” said Francis Xavier.

The TMACT plant at the quarters has two separate tanks for waste treatment. The tanks have ferro cement slab foundations.

“The compost is formed out of a layer of 6 inches of cow dung and 6 inches of dry leaves or paper. The cow dung and dry leaves should be laid in every 6 inches of waste heap,” said Mr. Xavier.

The dry leaves and paper promote growth of bacteria. The degradation happens in 70 degree Celsius facilitated by the cow dung and dry leaves.

“The completely filled tanks shall be kept for 90 days after which the manure will be ready,” shared Mr. Xavier. A tank for a TMACT plant costs Rs. 10,000.

More In: KERALA | NATIONAL

O
P
E
N

close

Recent Article in KERALA

Unique collection of handicraft products

The Gujarat emporium is back in Kozhikode with another grand collection of handloom and handicraft products from all over the country.»