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Depicting nature, love and humanity

Sangeetha Unnithan
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“Purush, prakriti aur prem,” an exhibition of paintings by artist Rajesh Bhowmik from Tripura being held at the Vyloppilli Samksrithi Bhavan, explores the indispensable connection between man, nature and love.

As many as 65 works on the topic by the artist are on display at the exhibition. Mr Bhowmik, who has conducted exhibitions in several parts of the country, said he has tried to convey that fact that there was no meaning to humanity without nature and love.

“I have been working on this topic for the past 11 years. Human beings and nature co-exist in this planet because of love. It is the relation between the three that I have depicted in my work,'' Mr. Bhowmik said.

The artist has also depicted the abuse of love and nature by man through his depiction of sex workers who are a recurring subject in his paintings.

“Nature is feminine. It has different shades and roles like the roles of womanhood. Although man cannot live without nature or love, he sometimes abuses both, as symbolised by prostitution,'' Mr. Bhowmik said.

Shades of brown, red, green and yellow are the predominant colours in his works.

According to him, brown is the colour of poverty, the pre-dominant background shade of slums, while red signifies both joy and danger.

Yellowing lives

Splattering of faded yellow has been used to symbolise the sad redundancy in the lives of sex workers.

“Green is associated with freshness as well as poison. I have used green in both these contexts,'' he said.

Mr Bhowmik, who is an assistant professor in History of Art and Painting at the University of Tripura, has used acrylic, oil colour, mixed media as well as Chinese ink for his paintings.

The exhibition concludes on Tuesday.

Sangeetha Unnithan

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