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CMC takeover might prove tough for govt.

Staff Reporter
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In solidarity:Activists and students stage a support rally welcoming the government decision to take over the medical college, at Kalamassery, on Wednesday.— Photo: By Special Arrangement
In solidarity:Activists and students stage a support rally welcoming the government decision to take over the medical college, at Kalamassery, on Wednesday.— Photo: By Special Arrangement

It’s not going to be an easy task for the government when it begins the process of taking over the Cochin Medical College considering the legal and financial commitments of the institution.

Auditing the college’s expenditure, its earnings under the cooperative sector, salaries of staff, employees’ appointment and promotions are among the key issues the government will have to consider when implementing its decision. The District Collector will be in charge of the process.

‘A big step’

Meanwhile, the students and teachers of the college have welcomed the government’s decision. “The fact that the government has finally decided to take over the college was certainly a big step, said Dr. Sanil N. K, a Kochi-based Urologist who had been part of the public movement that demanded government’s intervention in the college.

The students’ union led a rally around the HMT junction, Kalamassery, on Wednesday welcoming the decision. “The government has acceded to the public demand for easy access to healthcare treatment", said Sreeshyam K. S, coordinator of the students’ protest committee and former chairman of the students’ union.

“There is also a demand to set up a cancer hospital within the medical college that will be of immense help to the people in Central Kerala”, said Dr. Sanil. “The Regional Cancer Centre in Thiruvananthapuram is part of the medical college there situated in five acres. The Cochin Medical College has about 35 acres of excess land that can be utilised to set up an integrated medical complex”, he added.

The the students and the faculty members of the college are keen to see how the government is going about in implementing its decision. There are concerns that a procedural delay of three to four months might derail the next academic schedule.

There is a strong demand to set up

a cancer hospital

on the medical college premises since it will help

a large chunk of people from

central Kerala.

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