SEARCH

Pre-counselling Guidance Programme in the city sees lively sessions

print   ·   T  T  
GIVING TIPS: G. Rajan, Senior Assistant Professor of Pathology at Government medical college in the city, speaking at the Pre-Counselling Guidance Programme for professional courses on Thursday. Ajay Antony, director, TIME, Thiruvananthapuram, Rajoo Krishnan, Joint Commissioner, Commisionerate of Entrance Examinations, and Y.R. Sarma, former Director of the Indian Institute of Spices Research, are also seen. Photo: S. Ramesh Kurup
GIVING TIPS: G. Rajan, Senior Assistant Professor of Pathology at Government medical college in the city, speaking at the Pre-Counselling Guidance Programme for professional courses on Thursday. Ajay Antony, director, TIME, Thiruvananthapuram, Rajoo Krishnan, Joint Commissioner, Commisionerate of Entrance Examinations, and Y.R. Sarma, former Director of the Indian Institute of Spices Research, are also seen. Photo: S. Ramesh Kurup

Staff Reporter

Students get the right advice from experts in various fields

KOZHIKODE: Is mechanical engineering not for girls? Can boys opt for B.Sc. nursing? How many options can one give at the Centralised Allotment Process (CAP) for admission to professional colleges? What about studying MBBS in Russia and China?

These were some of the queries of students participating at the Pre-counselling Guidance Programme organised by The Hindu-Educationplus, in association with the State Bank of Travancore (SBT), here on Thursday.

Nearly 400 students and parents participated in the programme, which saw several lively sessions. G. Rajan, Senior Assistant Professor of Pathology at the Government medical college here, who was one of the resource persons, spoke about the need to develop a good doctor-patient relationship.

Good communication skills, aptitude and empathy for patients were essential for students taking up a career in medicine. Unfortunately, most of the students now pursuing MBBS courses lacked proper communication skills, he added.

"Majority of patients come to hospital out of stress and anxiety. If you speak to them, 90 per cent of their illness will be gone. Now, we have to coach them [students] about even breaking the news of death to relatives," he said.

Dr. Rajan said that MBBS was not a tough course. "Above average intelligence, reasonable IQ and good memory power are necessary for a student [taking up the course]," he said.

One should not pursue the medicine field thinking that it was a glamorous one. "It is not glamorous at all. Nobody comes to hospital for entertainment. All come to hospital in a frustrated state. Hence, we must set aside our personal needs and attend to them," Dr. Rajan said.

He said the criteria for choosing a medical college should always be based on the number of patients that come to that particular medical college hospital.

Y.R. Sarma, former Director of the Indian Institute of Spices Research (IISR), stressed that aptitude was the foremost thing that mattered. Studying for B.Sc. agriculture and completing it did not mean that one should confine oneself to some remote village. There were tremendous opportunities in this sector.

Rajoo Krishnan, Joint Commissioner, Commisionerate of Entrance Examinations, explained the method of CAP to the students. He said the Government was planning to introduce the acceptance of options from students through the website. CAP was being held for medical, engineering, architecture and pharmacy courses in that order. The rank list for architecture was yet to be ready. It would be out within a few days.

From last year, CAP was decentralised, with it being held in Kozhikode, Ernakulam and Thiruvananthapuram. This year, it was likely to be held at Government Engineering College, West Hill, here, he said. Allotment was being done only in rank order irrespective of place of reporting of the candidates. The important thing was to report at CAP venue 30 minutes before the time slot allotted to them. No personal intimation would be sent to the candidates. Notification and schedule would be published on the website. Also, visit the website www.cee-kerala.org for the final schedule. He advised the students to look out for announcements in the media about CAP.

Ajay Antony, director, TIME, Thiruvananthapuram, said the engineering courses could be classified into three: conventional, specialised and new-generation courses. The possibilities of new generation-courses were not yet explored yet. But the problem with taking up these new-generation courses was that the student should have the aptitude to do research.

Four points to be kept in mind while choosing the branch included aptitude of the student, long- term career plan of the student, the choice of college he or she wanted to get admission and employability of the branch at present and four years from now, he said.

The reputation of the college included the years that the college had been in existence and how many students had got good placement. Private companies scout for colleges with reputation. At times, they ignored a college even if a particular branch happened to be reputed.

C.R. Seshasayee, Assistant General Manager, SBT, Kozhikode, said the bank offered loans up to Rs. 10 lakhs for studies in India. The interest rate for up to Rs. 4 lakhs was only 11 per cent. For loans above Rs. 4 lakhs, 2 per cent interest was being levied. The repayment could begin one year after the course period or six months after getting a job. The loan could be repaid in five to seven years after commencement of repayment.

K. Sainathan, Assistant General Manager, SBT, spoke.

More In: KERALA | NATIONAL

O
P
E
N

close

Recent Article in KERALA

Ultimate aim is prohibition, says KPCC president

Kerala Pradesh Congress Committee (KPCC) president V.M. Sudheeran has said the State government led by Oommen Chandy is committed to and... »