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‘Water scarcity even in 18th century’

Staff Reporter
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A Cycle Jatha was taken out from Freedom Park on the occasion of World Water Day in Bangalore on Saturday.—Photo: K. Murali Kumar
A Cycle Jatha was taken out from Freedom Park on the occasion of World Water Day in Bangalore on Saturday.—Photo: K. Murali Kumar

: The city faced water scarcity even in the 18th century, according to D.K. Subramanian, former Dean of Indian Institute of Science. He said the then government had even issued orders prohibiting citizens from using water for gardening purposes.

He was speaking at the World Water Day celebrations organised by the Bangalore Water Supply and Sewerage Board (BWSSB) and Bangalore Jalamandali Abhiyantarara Sangha, here on Saturday.

From depending on T.G. Halli, Arkavathy and Sharavathi, the city was now heavily dependent on the Cauvery. With conservation of water being crucial, Dr. Subramanian called upon engineers to make use of the latest technology to put in place a “smart water supply system”. This, he said, would help reduce leakage, plug pilferage and bring down the energy consumption.

Seconding this, M.S. Mohan Kumar, professor of civil engineering, Indian Institute of Science, said with the smart water supply system, the BWSSB would be able to bring in efficiency and work towards solving water scarcity. He also said the BWSSB should have complete control of water in the city, including storm water drains and lakes.

Additional Chief Secretary, Urban Development Department, D. Satya Murty said the BWSSB should be limited to functioning as a “demand and supply manager.” The need of the hour was to work towards efficient use of water, conserving sources, 100 per cent metering and bringing in global standards in operations and management. “With climate change, we will be faced with critical problems. We must think out of the box to meet the citizens’ expectations,” he said.

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