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JD(S) manifesto focusses on farmers

Staff Reporter
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Janata Dal (S) president H.D. Deve Gowda releasing the party manifesto in Bangalore on Saturday.— Photo: K. Murali Kumar
Janata Dal (S) president H.D. Deve Gowda releasing the party manifesto in Bangalore on Saturday.— Photo: K. Murali Kumar

The Janata Dal (Secular) on Saturday unveiled a slew of farmer-friendly proposals, besides promising a massive housing scheme at a cost of Rs. 85,000 crore, in the party’s manifesto. It has also promised waiver of all loans of farmers, weavers, fishermen and artisans.

Pension to farmers, agriculture labourers, fishermen, weavers and rural artisans, scientific price for agricultural produce, 75 per cent subsidy on seeds and tractors, subsidy on fertilizers, solving problems of sugarcane farmers, and additional payment of Re. 1 per litre to milk producers are among the other promises.

The party has also promised to invest Rs. 65,000 crore to irrigate 10 lakh acres over the next five years, divert west-flowing rivers to solve water problem in Hassan, Tumkur, Chickballapur and Kolar and implement the Upper Krishna Project (II).

“We have never failed to fight for the people of Karnataka and our fight will go on. The major issue before the party now is to protect our reservoirs and the rightful share of the State,” said the former Prime Minister and party president H.D. Deve Gowda, who released the manifesto here.

Citing the instance of Tamil Nadu, he said: “regional parties can protect State’s interest. Two regional parties are doing it there (T.N.),” he added.

A housing development programme at a cost of Rs. 39,000 crore for rural dwellers and in urban areas at a cost of Rs. 46,150 crore to construct about 30 lakh homes has been promised.

It has also proposed development of industrial corridors, strengthening the industrial sector, and the Lokayukta.

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