The transfers of IAS officers effected apparently keeping in view the compulsions of the run up to the election year have brought cheer to some for landing plum posts but have left quite a few senior officials disappointed.

Efficiency, integrity and good track record in formulating key policy decisions and implementing the given mandate need not necessarily be the criteria in reshuffling of bureaucrats, in a crucial year, sources point out.

The priority will shift to assess how best an official will deliver what the ruling party desires with not too many inconvenient queries posed and take forward the ambitious government programmes to the next level.

When it becomes imperative for the ruling party to keep all stakeholders reasonably satisfied its MLAs, MPs, and people besides not getting bad press, it helps to have bureaucrats who are not too rigid if not pliable, say sources. This perhaps explains the adjustments that have been made by shifting out some senior bureaucrats from their present postings in line with the biding of the Ministers.

Anil Punetha, who gave effect to the New Land Allotment Policy of the government, has been shifted to agriculture in place of Nagireddy who has been eased out of that department as believed to have preferred by Agriculture Minister Kanna Lakshminarayana.

APIIC Vice-Chairman and Managing Director B. R. Meena, instrumental in exposing the deviations in the MoUs entered by Emaar Properties and Raheja Group and putting several others on notice for not taking up the proposed projects in the land allotted, will now assume charge as Principal Secretary, Revenue.

Higher Education Secretary M. G. Gopal with whom Deputy Chief Minister Damodar Rajanarasimha is reportedly not too happy has been shifted to Endowments. Ajay Mishra, Principal Secretary, GAD (Political) in the CMO, will take charge of higher education.

What surprised the official circles is the posting of Shiva Shankar, a relative junior to hold the GAD (Political) post mostly held by those in the rank of Principal Secretary.

Chandravadan who succeeded in galvanising the Information and Public Relations Department with a professional approach and gave considerable boost to the Chief Minister’s image through the ‘Prajahitam’ too had to go.

Sources say he was a bit reluctant to carry out the orders of influential people in placing bulk of government advertisements to few agencies and chosen media organisations in violation of laid down norms.

When it becomes imperative for the

ruling party to keep all stakeholders reasonably satisfied, it helps to have bureaucrats who are not too rigid if not pliable, say sources