Staff Reporter

`Bid' to snatch microphone from Collector

Collector prefers not to lodge complaint, leaves it to IMA Says he will intensify the drive against violators of the ActInsists that enough time has been given for clinics to fall in line Collector prefers not to lodge complaint, leaves it to IMA Says he will intensify the drive against violators of the Act Insists that enough time has been given for clinics to fall in line

HYDERABAD: In an unsavoury incident, a doctor allegedly tried to snatch the microphone from Collector Arvind Kumar and caught hold of him while the latter was concluding a presentation on Pre-Natal Diagnostic Techniques (PNDT) Act at the Indian Medical Association (IMA) hall here on Saturday.

Taken aback by the turn of events, IMA office-bearers intervened and the matter subsided after they apologised to the Collector.

Doctor's version

The doctor in question, however, denied the whole episode and asserted that he was only trying to shake hands with Mr. Arvind Kumar. Officials, however, maintained that the doctor was angry because a scan machine operated by his acquaintance was seized as it was not registered and because the centre was not maintaining statutory records.

Following the incident, Mr. Arvind Kumar wrote to the association saying that he preferred not to lodge any complaint against the doctor and that it was up to the IMA to take follow-up action.

"In fact, I will intensify the drive because I am asking them only to follow an Act that is being vigorously implemented across the country," Mr. Kumar said. Earlier, the IMA's city unit requested the Collector to give them more time before going all out against violators of the Act.

Ill-treatment alleged

They also alleged that some doctors were being "ill-treated" by implementing authorities. Mr. Kumar replied that he had given a presentation on various sides of the Act at the same venue to the same organisation in February 2005 and that 14 months was enough for them to follow the Act.

"Asking for records that are mandatory as per the Act cannot be seen as ill-treatment. When there are many people who are following the Act religiously, why can't everybody do it? There is no escape from maintaining records at your clinics," he added.