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Courses other than IT also churn out enormous opportunities

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TIMELY COUNSEL: Vice-Chancellor of Acharya Nagarjuna University V Balamohan Das addressing a workshop organised by The Hindu Education Plus in Vijayawada on Friday. Photo: Ch. Vijaya Bhaskar
TIMELY COUNSEL: Vice-Chancellor of Acharya Nagarjuna University V Balamohan Das addressing a workshop organised by The Hindu Education Plus in Vijayawada on Friday. Photo: Ch. Vijaya Bhaskar

G. Ravikiran

Choose college and course carefully, EAMCET rankers told Choose college and course carefully, EAMCET rankers told

Career guidance workshop, third in the series, organised by The Hindu Education Plus held Visit colleges and find out the quality of teaching and availability of infrastructureStudents urged to reap rich benefits from career coun sellors and academic experts

VIJAYAWADA: Going by the present mood among EAMCET rankers, 50 per cent look for a good college before selecting their course and an equal number do it the other way round. Therefore, experts advise parents to visit colleges and find out from students about the quality of teaching and availability of infrastructure. However, the parents should leave the option to their children to make a choice.

It became amply clear that students weigh colleges and courses equally at a career guidance workshop, third in the series, organised by The Hindu Education Plus here on Friday for those qualified in EAMCET-2006.

While Nalanda Educational Institutions was the main sponsor of the workshop, Indian Bank, Kusalava TVS and Aditya TVS were the regional sponsors.

Sought after courses

ECE (electronics, computer science engineering), CSE (computer science engineering), and other IT-related courses still command most attention.

Vice-Chancellor of Acharya Nagarjuna University V. Balamohan Das, who delivered the inaugural address, advised students to reap rich benefits from career counsellors and academic experts.

Job prospects

Prof. Balamohan Das said that future engineers were looking at what would be the job prospects of a particular course by the time they would pass out of college.

He said career aspirants should live up to the eight letters in `engineer' - enthusiasm, navigation skills, good mathematics, inquisitiveness, networking capability, entrepreneurship, ethics and responsibility.

"Choose a right institute, a right course and a right place. It is not difficult," he added.

Myths

P. Trimurthy, head of computer science, ANU, said that there was no major difference between computer science and information technology. "If a student gets a seat in IT at a lesser fee, he can happily lap it up. There are many myths about job opportunities. If students are strong in their subjects and develop required skills, jobs are available for any branch of engineering," he added. Civil engineering would throw enormous opportunities if students get additional skills in computer related programmes like CAD or CAM.

Registrar of Dr. N.T.R. University of Health Sciences P. Jayakara Babu said rankers in medicine stream should verify the quality of teaching and infrastructure at private medical colleges. Also, they should check whether the colleges had accreditation from the Medical Council of India (MCI), which conducts yearly inspections.

Opportunities galore

Dr. Babu clarified that non-local students should get better ranks than locals if they want to get a seat in unreserved (UR) quota. He said that besides MBBS, dentistry and nursing were also throwing a lot of opportunities. Regional General Manager of The Hindu , Vijayawada, M. Krishna Kiran, presided over the session. Chief of Bureau of The Hindu , Vijayawada, A. Saye Sekhar, delivered the welcome address.


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