Over 40 per cent of students fail to clear their first year exam

Reflecting a grim picture of the engineering education quality in the State, a study has revealed that in 431 colleges more than 40 per cent students fail to clear their first year exams. The study was done by a three-member committee constituted by the government.

The figure pertains to not only new colleges but also established ones, and is based on the data analysed of 560 private engineering colleges. Among the new colleges (less than four-years-old), in 61 institutions passes are less than 20 per cent and between 21 and 40 per cent in 133 colleges. In 49 colleges it is between 41 to 60 per cent. Only 15 colleges could record passes between 61 to 84 per cent.

Among the established colleges (more than four-years-old) passes are less than 20 per cent in 36 colleges, between 21 to 40 per cent in 77 colleges and between 41 to 60 per cent in 75 colleges. In 30 colleges passes are between 61 to 80 per cent and only two colleges recorded passes between 81 to 83 per cent.

Senior professors agree that accumulation of backlogs continue till the final year and that's the reason why overall pass percentage is less than 50 per cent.

“Passes in first year are considered significant to judge the quality of teaching standards apart from the academic environment created,” says a former Vice-Chancellor.

“Colleges fail to infuse sense of engineering education in first year, and the non-serious attitude finally affects job opportunities. Faculty is anyway bad but colleges don't even conduct expert lectures from industry or senior professors to give seriousness to the studies,” he points out.

Proving his argument correct the report further reveals in 537 colleges there were less than 30 expert lectures in the entire year.

In 69 colleges not a single lecture was conducted while 346 colleges conducted less than 10 lectures and 93 colleges conducted expert lectures between 11 and 20. Only 16 colleges among the 560 conducted more than 30 expert lectures.

Reflecting poor quality of teachers, the study also revealed that among the 224 old colleges 190 did not earn a single paisa from consultancy while 20 colleges earned between Rs. One to 10 lakh. Only one college crossed the Rs. One crore mark.

“It is a reflection of quality of teachers and their links with the industry. Obviously it is rubbed on to the students,” a senior official felt.


  • The figure pertains to not only new colleges but also established ones
  • The study was done by a three-member committee constituted by the government