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Fingerprint analysis helped solve 1,942 cases in a decade: Pachau

Staff Reporter
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Director-General of the National Crime Records Bureau Shafi Alam (left) and Principal Secretary, Home, V. Umesh, taking a look at a kit used by forensic experts, during the 15th All India Conference of directors of fingerprint bureaux in Bangalore on Monday.— Photo: G.P. Sampath Kumar
Director-General of the National Crime Records Bureau Shafi Alam (left) and Principal Secretary, Home, V. Umesh, taking a look at a kit used by forensic experts, during the 15th All India Conference of directors of fingerprint bureaux in Bangalore on Monday.— Photo: G.P. Sampath Kumar

Modernisation of the fingerprint bureau of the State police, which started in 2003, appears to have paid dividends.

In the last decade, 1,942 criminal cases have been solved purely with the help of fingerprint analysis, Director-General and Inspector-General of Police Lalrokhuma Pachau has said.

He was addressing delegates at the 15th All India Conference of directors of fingerprint bureaux.

“In 1,942 cases, the local police had no other clues. The valuable information regarding identification of the culprits was provided by the fingerprint experts soon after the search and comparison of fingerprints at the crime scene with information available in the Automated Fingerprint Identification System (AFIS) database,” he said.

The Automated Fingerprint Identification System is a software employed by the police to collect and segregate fingerprint samples and funnel it into a common State-level server. It was introduced in 2003.

Since then, the database of fingerprints in the State has grown to three lakh sets. “We are among the top three or four police departments in the country on a par with Delhi, Maharashtra and Haryana Police departments with regard to maintaining fingerprints database,” said Additional Director-General of Police (Crime) A.M. Prasad.

He said that a third of the police stations in the State now have live scanners to record fingerprints. “We are well on our way to achieving 100 per cent compliance,” he said.

But the initiatives of the Karnataka police have not been replicated in other States as a result of which a national framework for crime detection and criminal tracking has not yet been put in place.

The grand plan at the national level was to have all State-level databases connected to a national-level Crime and Criminal Tracking Network System (CCTNS). But due to poor databases in other States, the common national database is still a distant dream, Mr. Prasad said. Shafi Alam, Director-General of the National Crime Records Bureau, told delegates at the conference that they must take up the task of building fingerprint databases with a sense of urgency. “The CCTNS has to improve. The task [of achieving total compliance] should be completed soon,” he said.

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