Pesticides may kill off water insects and other small aquatic life by as much as 42 per cent, according to an analysis published on Monday.

The study is the reportedly the first to compare regional biodiversity in polluted versus less polluted water.

Freshwater invertebrates and aquatic insects were 42 per cent less common in strongly contaminated areas in Europe compared to less polluted areas; and in Australia, a difference of 27 per cent was found across regions.

The analysis included measurements of insecticides and fungicides, which are used often in agriculture and are typically well studied and heavily regulated.

However, the researchers said little examination has been done to gauge their effect on the streams and rivers they end up in after it rains and the chemicals are washed off farmland and into watercourses.

“The current practice of risk assessment is like driving blind on the motorway,” said ecotoxicologist Matthias Liess, a study co-author.

Species that were particularly vulnerable included dragonflies, stoneflies, mayflies and caddis flies.

The researchers warned that the threat pesticides pose to biodiversity has been underestimated, since experimental lab work and studies on artificial ecosystems often precede a pesticide's market approval.

The study called for new approaches to better assess the ecological risks of pesticides. A better practice would be to assess the ecological impact of chemicals by investigating real environments on a larger scale, the authors said.

The findings show that UN goals to slow down the decline in biodiversity by 2020 are “jeopardized,” it said.AFP