Australian scientists on Tuesday said they had identified a possible 280 additional craters on the Moon, a finding they said could shed light on the history of the Earth's natural satellite.

By combining gravity and topography data collected by satellites, the scientists from Curtin University in Western Australia were able to use computer modelling to at first identify two basins on the far side of the Moon.

They later developed a high-resolution image to find a total of 280 "candidate basins" which they suspect are craters.

"There are many more (craters) that have been mapped from optical observations or from just the shape of the topography," researcher Will Featherstone told AFP. "So there's many, many craters that were already known, we've just been able to apply this technique to enhance the ones that aren't so easy to see. "What we have been able to use is the topography and the gravity together to get a stronger indication that there is something there that needs further investigation."

Featherstone said the researchers looked at the lunar surface on both the near and far sides of the Moon, the dark side being more challenging because satellites cannot be tracked from Earth when they are on that side.