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Good old trainer to have pride of place in the sky

Staff Reporter
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Tiger Moth to make its debut appearance at the air show

vintage:The two-seat de Havilland DH82 Tiger Moth was a primary trainer aircraft for the Royal Air Force during World War II and the basic trainer aircraft for the Indian Air Force from 1940.
vintage:The two-seat de Havilland DH82 Tiger Moth was a primary trainer aircraft for the Royal Air Force during World War II and the basic trainer aircraft for the Indian Air Force from 1940.

A vintage Tiger Moth will give bigger and faster machines a run for their money at the 9th edition of Aero India, starting at the Air Force Station at Yelahanka on Wednesday.

Resurrected recently as part of the IAF Vintage flight, the two-seat de Havilland DH82 Tiger Moth was a primary trainer aircraft for the Royal Air Force during World War II and the basic trainer aircraft for the Indian Air Force from 1940.

Being flown for the first time at Aero India, the Tiger Moth was operated in the training schools of IAF and was replaced by the HT-2. The Tiger Moth has no electrical system and has to be started andrefuelled manually.

Also in the show will be India’s latest acquisition, the Boeing C-17 Globemaster III. A demo team from the Pacific Air Force based at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Hawaii, will execute high angle takeoffs, high-speed passes and an assault landing among other manoeuvres in the Boeing C-17 Globemaster III during the air show. India, in June 2011, decided to buy 10 of this heavy lift transport aircraft for its armed forces at a cost of $4.1 billion.

The air show will provide a platform for the C-17 to demonstrate its manoeuvring capabilities and give the Indian government an opportunity to see the latest aircraft that it has purchased, in action, Maj. Kenneth Kirkpatrick of 535th Airlift Squadron, said in a release.

A whopping one million litres or 1,000 kilolitres of aviation fuel is expected to be consumed by aircraft participating in Aero India 2013.

About 55 aircraft — both for flying display as well as static display — are taking part in the five-day show.

“We will be supplying between 800 kl and 1,000 kl of aviation fuel to the aircraft in the Aero India show, and the stock will be supplied in tankers from the Devanagundi facility, which is closer to the venue,”

Executive Director of the Karnataka Region of Indian Oil Corporation R.K. Arora told The Hindu here. Stating that aviation fuel for the show was not being imported, he said the fuel would be sourced from the IOC facilities in the country.

“There is no significant change in the quantum of fuel being supplied this time when compared to the previous edition,” he added.

Special BMTC Buses

The Bangalore Metropolitan Transport Corporation (BMTC) will operate special buses to the venue from Field Marshal Manekshaw Parade Ground, Kempe Gowda Bus Station, Hebbal Ring Road Junction and Yelahanka from 8 a.m. from Wednesday, the release said.

Depending on the demand, special bus services would be started from Yeshwanthpur, Jayanagar, Silk Board and Koramangala, it said.

As part of the elaborate healthcare facilities set up at the venue, there will be an air ambulance (AN-32) and a heli-ambulance (Mi-17 helicopter) of the Indian Air Force.

This is apart from 10 blood banks and a 40-bed hospital.




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