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Could the Tasmanian tiger be alive?

    — © Guardian Newspapers Limited
    2013
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Team claims that it has ‘highly credible’ witnesses and has found animal faeces that could belong to the extinct thylacine

Photo: AFP
Photo: AFP

It had been considered extinct for nearly 80 years, but the Tasmanian tiger has been declared alive and kicking by an intrepid group of British naturalists.

A team of investigators from the Centre for Fortean Zoology is currently in Tasmania hunting down clues to prove the thylacine, commonly known as the Tassie tiger, still exists.

The group claims to have gathered compelling evidence of the thylacine’s presence in remote parts of Tasmania’s north-west, despite the last known animal dying in Hobart Zoo on 7 September 1936.

The centre said it has talked to several “highly credible” witnesses of the thylacine and has found animal faeces that could belong to the beast. The droppings are being sent away for DNA analysis.

Richard Freeman from the organisation admitted that no pawprints or dead thylacines have been found, attributing this to the sparse rocky ground of the region and the ferociousness of Tasmanian devils, which swiftly devour animal corpses when they discover them.

However, Freeman said he had heard reports of distinctive thylacine kills, where prey is effectively disembowelled, as well as the discovery of the droppings.— © Guardian Newspapers Limited, 2013

Tassie’s tale

The thylacine was zealously hunted by European settlers due to fears the animal would ravage sheep stocks. Several attempts have been found to prove the animal still exists, although the Tasmanian government says that there is no conclusive evidence for this.


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