The land valuation process has undergone a sea change since the State witnessed a boom in 2004-05, writes G.V.Prasada Sarma

With the Stamps and Registration Department proposing revision of land rates and putting them on its website for objections from the public for the first time, the State has been set for yet another increase in land rates in the district.

The land valuation process has undergone a sea change since the State witnessed a boom in 2004-05. Before that in rural areas the revision was taken up every two years and in urban areas once a year. But after that in Hyderabad and other corporation areas the government went in for revision twice a year. Up to 2,000, the annual increase was 10 per cent. But after 2000 the department resorted to the general norm of making the rate 60 per cent of the market rate.

But after August 2010, when the revision was last resorted to, the government has not taken up revision following a downturn in the realty sector. In August last the exercise of gathering prevailing values in the jurisdiction of various sub-registrar offices in the district was carried out in anticipation of the government’s decision. But it was deferred.

Now with the government announcing the decision to revise land values from April 1, the exercise has been taken up by the sub-registrars concerned for a final decision by the Market Value Revision Committee, headed by the Joint Collector.

With the GVMC area and most of the other parts of the district that fall under VUDA purview coming under the urban category, the committee decides the land values to be raised. “The raise proposed varies between 20 per cent and 60 per cent. In the GVMC area we went by the information provided by the corporation on deciding whether it is commercial or residential. For residential the increase is proposed locality-wise while for commercial it is door-number wise,” DIG (Stamps and Registration) and district in charge registrar A. Nagalakshmi told The Hindu .

Guidelines given earlier like new door-numbers, conversion of NALA land, proximity to industrial areas have been taken into consideration. A total of 64 objections- 34 from Anakapalle and 30 from the city- have been received at the respective sub-registrar offices.

Anomalies like the variation between two neighbouring sub-registrar offices or peripheral areas have been calibrated. For instance, the Registrar Office at Super Bazar has more value and Dwarakanagar less value. The two were calibrated.

At Jagadamba Junction, objections were raised that same rate was fixed for the main road and the by-lanes around it. At Anakapalle, objection was raised for proposing agriculture land rate at Rs.96 lakh.Another objection related to deciding rate at square yard for agricultural land in the growth area. The objection was raised earlier too and an index was fixed, said Ms. Nagalakshmi.

“If only below 50 per cent of the land is developed, the rate increases is proposed on the basis of agriculture rate; if the development is between 50 and 75 per cent, 60 to 70 per cent of square yard will be made to applicable and if it is above 75 per cent, house-site rate will be applied,” says Ms. Nagalakshmi.

While revision is imminent, the committee will consider the objections raised before doing so and take a final decision.

Guidelines given earlier like new door-numbers, conversion of NALA land, proximity to industrial areas have been taken into consideration. A total of 64 objections- 34 from Anakapalle and 30 from the city- have been received at the respective sub-registrar offices.